Information on Empire Sewing Machine Company's web pages, regarding the Juengst family and their various companies, factories name and their location, including those links to Remington S.M. Co., come from different sources, appear to present some discrepancies and consequently arduous to line up dates.

 

EMPIRE SEWING MACHINE CO.
 
Established 1861

Factory:  Somers, Westchester County, N.Y.

Principal Office:  536 Broadway, New York

 

EMPIRE SEWING MACHINE MANUFACTURING COMPANY

 

 

MAHOPAC MANUFACTURING COMPANY

 

 

WESTERN EMPIRE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY

a joint stock company of Chicago, incorporated under the laws of the State of Illinois for the purpose of manufacturing sewing machines

 

REMINGTON EMPIRE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY

a joint stock company of Ilion, New York, constitute after the Great Fire of Chicago in 1871 until 1874 c.

 

1861   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 335 Broadway, New York

1861   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 510 Broadway, New York

1862   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 510 Broadway, New York

1863   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 510 Broadway, New York

1864   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 454 Broadway, New York

1864   Empire Sewing Machine Mfg. Co. 536 Broadway, New York

1865   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 536 Broadway, New York

1866   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 536 Broadway, New York

1867   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 616 Broadway, New York

1868   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 616 Broadway, New York

1869   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 294   Bowery,   New York

1870   Empire Sewing Machine Co. 294   Bowery,   New York


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US 27.132                             George Juengst

Sewing Machine

...what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. The combination of the rotating shafts F K, one of them carrying a revolving arm J and the other two revolving cranks G H, when the said shafts, arm and cranks are arranged and operate as herein shown and described.

2. The shuttle-driver, with its jointed horn i, ear r and spring p, applied and operating in combination with the guide m, n, o on one side of the shuttle-race and operating substantially as herein described. 

February 14, 1860

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US 28.869                             George Juengst

Sewing Machine Shuttle

In sewing machine shuttles the bobbin is generally made with a male center at each end and held in place between two female centers provided in the shell of the shuttle and one of the latter is made movable for the purpose of permitting the introduction and removal of the bobbin and held up to the bobbin by means of a spring. This movable center and its spring are generally introduced from the exterior of the shell through an opening which extends right through the heel thereof, but which, after the center and the spring are inserted, is closed by a plug inserted in from the exterior and secured by soldering. Shuttles have also been formed with the movable spring-center in the point; but the same was inserted when being manufactured and no provision was made for introducing a new spring in case injury to that before inserted, or when one of a different strength was desired. My said invention consists in a movable bush, through which the center passes and which bush fills up the parallel hole containing the spring and is held in place by a clamping screw. 

June 26, 1860

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GB 2.340                               Joseph McCrossan

Sewing Machine

To Joseph McCrossan, of Glasgow, in the county of Lanark, North Britain, Merchant, for improvements in sewing machines. A communication to him from abroad by George Juengst, residing at New York. Letters Patent sealed

September 26, 1860

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US 31.691                              George Juengst

Sewing Machine

My improvements relate to that class of sewing machines where the straight needle is used with the shuttle and the feed-wheel and they have reference to the means for giving motion to the needle, specially regarding the formation and condition of the loop of the needle's thread, to means for taking up the thread and tightening the stitch and to means for making and regulating the feed. 

Assignor to J. McCrossan and T. J. McArthur

March 12, 1861

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April 1861 New York
April 1861 New York
May 1861 New York
May 1861 New York
New York 1862
New York 1862
May 1863
May 1863

 

1864

Empire Sewing Machine factory was incorporated in South Somers in 1864 on the Muscoot River, under the direction of George Juengst and ceased operation in 1871. Empireville, a busy community which included a hotel and foundry, grew up around the factory, which employed 100 people. After the factory closed the buildings were used by the St. Joseph's Normal College, a Christian Brothers Teaching college. T.J. McArthur & Co., manufacturers and proprietors of the Empire Sewing Machine Company, opened new Salerooms in:

536 Broadway, New York

250 Washington Street, Boston

921 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia

 

 

April 1864
April 1864

 

 

Empire Sewing Machine Mfg. Co.

T.J. McArthur & Co.            536 Broadway, N. Y.

250 Washington Street, Boston

921 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia

1864

November 1864
November 1864
1865 Empire Works, Somers, Westchester Co., N.Y.
1865 Empire Works, Somers, Westchester Co., N.Y.
March 1865
March 1865
November 1865
November 1865
1866
1866
1867
1867
1867 Boot & Shoe No. 4 Machine
1867 Boot & Shoe No. 4 Machine
January 1868
January 1868
1868
1868
1868
1868
1868
1868
April 1869
April 1869
1869-70 c.    Advertisement
1869-70 c. Advertisement
August 1869
August 1869
October 1869
October 1869
January 1870
January 1870

 

 

1870

The Empire Sewing Machine Company's factory, seem it was built in Somers already, not far from the Red Mill; the article maybe refer to Mahopac Manufacturing Company, which may had some connection with the Empire Sewing Machine Company.

In 1871, when the Aqueduct Commission claimed the waters of the Muscoot River, the Juengsts no longer had enough water to power their mills.   George Juengst Sr. then founded, with his sons George Jr. and Charles, a machine shop in a building he leased from Joel Purdy in Croton Falls (Somers).

July 1870
July 1870

One of the first locations to develop was the corner of Route 6N, Hill Street and Myrtle Avenue. This was due to the fast running stream that flowed from Kirk Lake and Lake Mahopac, creating the necessary power to turn the large mill stones. A small mill was built in the early 1700′s and when the Morris’ saw the potential, they immediately built a much larger one, which was the largest building in all the county. This mill was to play an important part in the coming American Revolution. One of the original mill stones can still be found as part of the front steps of the e Mills branch of the Mahopac Nation Bank. Since all of the building in the area were painted red, this area was called Red Mills for a long period of time. Although the famous mill there is gone, one of its original millstones forms a part of the front steps of the Red Mills Branch of Mahopac National Bank.

www.mahopacmarine.com

 

October 1870
October 1870

 

 

1871

 

In 1865 the Remington began the manufacture of agricultural implements, under a separate organization  and in 1871, buying out the Empire Company, they went into the sewing machine business.

In 1871 the Remingtons will buying out the Empire Company, they went into the sewing machine business. A few years later they put their celebrated type writers on the market and later still they began the manufacture of fire engines. In all these enterprises Samuel took a leading part and much of the success of the company is due to his good judgment and energy. The sewing machine branch of the business has grown rapidly, especially the export trade; as their extensive foreign connections gave them superior facilities in that direction. Mr. Remington was a typical American man of business. He was just as well as generous and his death, even at such an advanced age, when his life-work might be considered ended, leaves a vacancy that will be keenly felt both in his business and his family circle.

Empire sewing machine, late 1860s. Although an Empire Sewing Machine Co. existed in New York in the 1860s (the predecessor of the Remington-Empire Co.), it is not known whether this machine was manufactured by that same company, which was primarily concerned with producing shuttle machines. This chainstitch machine is marked “Empire Co., Patented April 23, 1863,” the date referring again to Ketchum’s patent.

 

It is very similar to Folsom’s Globe, except that it has claw feet rather than a closed base; the painted designs on the base of both are almost identical to those on the Monitor. Its spool holder, mounted in reverse, is a crude imitation of the Folsom patent. The Empire machines were probably manufactured about the same time as the Wilson machine. (Photo courtesy of The Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village, Dearborn, Michigan.)

 

 

1867 serial number 14.023
1867 serial number 14.023
1867 Boot & Shoe No. 4 Machine
1867 Boot & Shoe No. 4 Machine
1868 New Empire S. M. Company
1868 New Empire S. M. Company

 

SEWING MACHINES MANUFACTURED AND SOLD FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 10, 1867

 

Double-Thread Machines

 

The Singer Manufacturing Co. ........................................................... 43.053

The Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co. ........................................... 38.055

The Grover & Baker Sewing Machine Co. ............................................ 32.999

The Howe Machine Co. .................................................................... 11.053

The Florence Sewing Machine Co. ..................................................... 10.534

The Weed Sewing Machine Co. ........................................................... 3.638

The Elliptic Sewing Machine Co. .......................................................... 3.185

The Aetna Sewing Machine Co. ........................................................... 2.958

The Finkle & Lyon Sewing Machine Co. ................................................ 2.488

The Empire Sewing Machine Co. .................................................... 2.121

The Leavitt Sewing Machine Co. ......................................................... 1.051

Total Double-Thread Machines .................................................. 151.135

 

1872-74 New York Directory
1872-74 New York Directory

 

1874

Chicago, July 15. The fire yesterday originated in a low frame building used for storing rags and adjoining an oil factory that stood between Fourth Avenue and Clarke Street on Taylor Street. There was a stiff southwest breeze blowing, so that by time the flames had consumed the small dwellings, stables, carpenter shops and buildings filled with oil, paper and rags, the fire had reached State Street, where there were substantial business houses; they were like the heat of a furnace, all-consuming in power. The newspapers comment in strong terms on the policy of allowing wooden buildings in the city limits. The most prominent among the business losses are the St. James Hotel, the Remington Empire Sewing Machine Company, Remington & Sons gun and pistol manufactory, McCheney’s sale stables, the Pressing Vinegar Works, Schreffertin & Bro., furniture manufacturers and a large number of others. The area burnt over covers 15 squares, taking bits and half blocks here and there and lumping the whole. The burnt area is about half a mile long and a little less wide and embraced tumbledown shanties and palatial avenue residences.