US PATENTS IN 1857

This list of patents is far than be complete, further researches will be done, including patents for Needles and Knitting Machines.

Number of applications for patents during the year ...................... 4.771

Patents issued during the year ...................................................... 2.910

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JANUARY 1857

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US 16.382                                Milton  Finkle

Sewing Machine

The loop former B is made to pass in the shuttle race C, just forward of the shuttle and forms and enters the loop first. By this means the shuttle can enter and pass through the loop with ease. As soon as the shuttle gets nearly though, the loop-former B is withdrawn; then, when the needle is going down, the shuttle is separated from it, by the thickness of the loop former and therefore the needle is in no danger of being broken.

Claim: The construction and use of the loop-former for the purpose of parting the thread from the needle, so that the shuttle will be certain to enter in the manner described.

January 13, 1857

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US 16.387                               A.  F.  Johnson

Sewing Machine

The inventor says: I do not claim the peculiar construction and arrangement of the mechanism described for driving and operating the machine, as I intend to make it subject matter of another application for patent.

I claim neither the set screw, nor a circular plate or cylindrical body rotating upon eccentric pivots, as new means for adjustment. But I claim combining the hook when furnished with a lever or arm as described with the eccentric-headed screw q and the adjustable projection or screw r, for the double purpose of taking, first, the loop properly from the needle and secondly, for actuating the hook at the proper time for the needle to take the loop from the hook.

January 13, 1857

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US16.434                             James  E. A.  Gibbs

Sewing Machine

On turning crank handle E a vibrating motion is imparted to the rocking shaft C and needle head R, so that said needle head will ascend laterally when the handle is turned in an upward direction, and descend, in returning, the same path it followed up. The needle is guided, first, by cross bars I and, after passing through the cloth on table a, it is guided upon the inclined plane of the stationary crochet hook M. The loop is formed by the needle passing the thread over the crochet point, where it remains until the needle, in its next downward motion, passes through the loop and draws it off hook M. The further motion of handle E will bring cam F in contact with roller G of the tail piece of cloth clamp X and cause its elevation in front, the rigid feeding hook Y propelling the cloth one step when said clamp is raised.

Claim: Making the chain-stitch with a vibrating needle in combination with a stationary hook.

January 20, 1857

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US 16.436                                Elias  Howe jr.

Sewing Machine

The needle employed in this machine is pointed at both ends and has an eye at the centre of its length to receive the thread. This needle is seized alternately by two pairs of nippers and D1, which are situated at opposite sides of the cloth and which alternately push the needle into the cloth and withdraw it therefrom. As the needle is forced through the cloth and when arrived at its lowest point, it is withdrawn a slight distance, thus causing the thread to form a loop, which is seized by finger a of lever J, said lever turning on the fulcrum K and being operated by cam G and arms I and h. As the lever J and finger a move to the position represented in dotted lines, the latter draws the slack thread from the needle and tightens the stitch.

Claim: Drawing the thread through the cloth by means of a finger, or its equivalent, acting in connexion with mechanism which passes the needle through the cloth, substantially as set forth.

 

(England, July 26, 1848 ???                                         January 20, 1857

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FEBRUARY 1857

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US 16.518                             Elisa  Alexander

Sewing Machine Attachment

Claim: Combining the mechanism of the guiding and conveying rollers a and c with the mechanism operating a sewing machine having an independent feed, in such a manner that the said rollers shall guide automatically the finished work away from the machine in a straight line, by revolving in opposite directions with a speed regulated by that of the machine.  

February 3, 1857

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US 16.554                             Samuel  F.  Pratt

Sewing Machine

Arm o1 of hook N turns on pin s screwed into a bevelled standard t, so as to allow the hook to move in a vertical plane up to and into the vertical plane of the needle B and seam and back from said plane; said movements being diagonal to said plane and being produced by the arm o2 being acted upon by the curved plate m, extending from lower rocker arm I. When the needle is at its highest position, the thread will be cast in a loop over the hook N; when the needle descends, it passes into and carries the thread through the loop; the point w of plate u strikes now arm o2 thereby withdrawing the hook. When the needle rises and the thread slackens, part a2 of plate u pushes forward arm o2 and the hook through the slack in the thread. As the needle has risen above the cloth the feed motion takes place and during the same the plate a2, in consequence of its peculiar shape, stops moving the hook until the point of the needle, has again descended to the loop, when the operation will continue as above. The feed motion will be understood from the engravings.

The inventor says: I do not claim the particular motions of the feed bar K, in vertical and horizontal directions. But I claim the combination with the arm I of the spring f, the projections i l, the bent lever L and its projection h, or their equivalents, the same being to produce the motion of the feed bar, in the manner as described. I also claim moving the loop hook or looper N diagonally up to and away from the needle, substantially in the manner as specified and I also claim effecting the movements of the loop-hook N at the proper times, substantially in the manner as described, that is to say, by means of the plate u attached to the arm I, operating upon the arm o2 of the looper.

February 3, 1857

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US 16.566                                Joshua  Gray

Sewing Machine

Attached to the under surface of the machine is a plate F, upon which slides a plate G; the bar H slides in a recess in plate and it carries a pin g that plays in the slot h, thus imparting the required motions to plate G and hook c, which latter is fastened to plate G. The hook c forms the loop, in combination with a vibrating needle. The bar H receives its vibrating motions from the eccentric that operates also this needle bar.

Claim: The combination and arrangement of the plate G and slide H, with their slots and pins, operating in the manner substantially as described, for the purpose of giving the required motions to the hook, as set forth.

Assignor to Himself and John Gault

February 3, 1857

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US 16.609                     Thomas J. W.  Robertson

Sewing Machine

The operation of this device will be understood from the engravings. Claim: The spiral groove in the needle leading upward from the eye on one side, in combination with the looper b, in the manner and for the purpose described. I also claim the loop guide c in combination with the looper for laying the loop, as described. I also claim the guard pin e, or its equivalent, for the purpose set forth.  

February 10, 1857

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MARCH 1857

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US 16.710                           Charles  D.  Belcher

Sewing Machine

The brake piece b is firmly secured in its holder a, but may be adjusted by slot and screw x, so that it may be brought nearer to the hook as its edge wears away. The periphery of the hook is sufficiently pressed against the brake to prevent the threads from passing under it, by means of spring m; this spring is attached to the frame of the machine and presses against the vibratory arm D. The brake is attached to the end of this arm D. The brake is separated at the proper moment from the periphery of the hook by means of cam d pressing against stud h upon arm D; l is a small friction roller at the end of the stud.

Claim: The improvement on the patents of A. B. Wilson described, consisting in the application of an unyielding brake b, to hold the loop upon the revolving hook B and imparting a positive movement thereto, in such a manner as to separate it from and bring it to the periphery of the hook at the proper moment, substantially as specified.

March 3, 1857

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US 16.713                         Joseph  W.  Burnham

Sewing Machine

The cutter a is attached to the under side of the machine in such a way that by a quick motion of the hand on the pad o, when the machine stops its operation, the cutter will cut the thread below the work and leave the thread in readiness to commence sewing in another place.

Claim: The employment on sewing machines of the mechanism hereinbefore described, so as to cut or clip the thread on the under side of the work.  

March 3, 1857

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US 16.734                            Lucius J.  Knowles

Weavers' Shuttle

March 3, 1857

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US 16.745                             Samuel  F.  Pratt

Sewing Machine

F is the arm that operates the machine; F carries the feeding apparatus H and is also rigidly connected with the needle carrier E. As F is raised, the needle is raised above the cloth and the bar H rises, the spring I presses the nipper K upwards, so as to clamp the cloth at 0. The bar H rising still further presses the cloth up into the grooved projecting foot of D, thereby drawing or feeding the cloth for the next stitch. When the needle descends through the cloth, the spring P will come down upon the cloth so as to flatten it and prepare it for the next ascent of H.

Claim: Producing successive corrugations or folds in the cloth, substantially in the manner described, for the purpose of feeding the cloth for the production of the stitches. Also, the combination of the lifter spring I, the nipper spring K, the rod H, and the flattening spring P, they operating together and upon the cloth essentially as specified.  

March 3, 1857

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US 16.850                          T. J. W.  Robertson

Sewing Machine

The engraving and claim show the nature of this invention.

Claim: The inventor says: I do not claim the broad idea of pulling the cloth through a sewing machine, independent of any tool or contrivance for so doing. Neither do I claim the broad idea of moving cloth by means of hooks in all kinds of machines; for an example of such a movement is seen in the weaving temple of J. C. Tilton, patented in 1855. But I claim feeding the cloth in sewing machines by means of a hook, having one or more points, constructed and operating substantially as described.

March 17, 1857

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US 16.914                           James  E. A.  Gibbs

Sewing Machine

The operation of this apparatus is as follows: Supposing the needle of a lock-stitch machine to have passed through the cloth, down between the hooks 1 and 2 and to be about to withdraw, leaving a loop under the cloth, the hook 1, which is now placed in readiness to enter the loop, is caused to revolve and twist the thread a turn so as to pass the loop of the needle thread around and over the thread case A, when the needle is again brought down; the other hook 2 then faces the next loop presented and by the return revolution twists the thread a turn or part of a turn in the contrary direction. Claim:

1st. Making a series of lock-stitches with a double hook, reciprocating its motion of a single revolution or part of such revolution, substantially as herein set forth.

2nd. In combination with a sewing machine the challon thread case A, of a spherical, oval, or any similar form, for containing a ball of thread having no fixed axis of revolution.

3d. Also attaching to the globular thread case A a plate B, or its equivalent, furnished with two hooks 1 and 2, which are placed symmetrically in the manner specified and combining the whole with any suitable mechanism that will impart thereto a reciprocating motion of a single revolution, or part of such revolution, when the axis of revolution is fixed, substantially as set forth.

March 31, 1857

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APRIL 1857

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US 17.049          Willford H. Nettleton & Charles Raymond

Sewing Machine

The press bar u, swinging on fulcrum 19, is kept down on the cloth by spring 20 and can be raised for inserting the articles to be sewed; the under side of said press bar, on each side of the slot in which the needle and feeding points operate, is formed with grooves 21 diverging from each other as shown at fig. 1, so that, as the cloth is fed along, the divergence of the grooves stretches the seam widthwise, rendering the same flat and preventing any puckering or wrinkling by the needle feed points. The looper r is used when the machine is worked with two threads and the looper v when operated with one thread.

The inventors say: We do not claim a single or double loop stitch, as that is well known; neither do we claim a needle feed, as this has already been used; neither do we claim the slide cam o and slot 11 in themselves, as these have before been used and we are well aware that diverging grooves have been used for stretching the cloth widthways in shearing and similar machinery; but we are not aware that the press bar has ever before been grooved in the manner shown, to prevent the needle puckering the cloth as it is fed along in the manner shown. What we claim is forming the face of the press bar next the material to be sewed, with diverging grooves to keep the cloth stretched widthways and prevent puckering under the operation of the needle, substantially as and for the purposes specified. Also the looper (r or v) formed with the notch 13, into which the needle enters to insure the taking of a loop, when the said looper is combined with the slide o and slot 11, or their equivalents, for giving the necessary sideways motion for the purposes and substantially as specified.

April 14, 1857

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MAY 1857

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US 17.186                               Bryan Atwater

Sewing Machine

The inventor says: I do not claim forming a loop for a chain-stitch and holding it in position to receive the succeeding loop wherein a stationary shuttle is used, as in the patent of T. J. W.  Robertson.

But I claim the arrangement described, by which I am enabled to keep the loop of the needle thread positively in position by guides alone, without the necessity of introducing a looper or any other device into the loop, or making the loop pass around a hook or fixed shuttle; that is to say:

First. The described arrangement of guides for forming the loop from the slack of the needle thread and directing the same by an external operation to a position for the needle to pass through it, consisting of a stationary guide-piece J, a stationary notched plate or edge g and two stationary guides m m, arranged as specified, in proper relation to each other and to the needle and the cloth, or other material to be sewed and employed in connexion with a proper feeding movement of the cloth or material, to operate substantially as described and in combination with the said contrivance, I claim the guide plate j, with its lip I, arranged and operating as set forth.

Second. Though I do not claim the dog L, operating as described in connexion with an elastic foot-piece K on the face of the cloth, as in the machine of T. J. W. Robertson, to produce the feeding movement of the cloth or other material to be sewed, I claim the attachment of the dog L to lever M, arranged and operated upon by a wiper q, on the driving shaft E, as set forth, to produce a quick or sudden feeding movement of the cloth or other material, which shall, at the same time, aid in throwing the loop in the path of the needle, as and for the purpose specified.

May 5, 1857

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US 17.272                            Benjamin  Garvey

Needles for Sewing

May 12, 1857

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US 17.366                         Solomon  B.  Ellithorp

Sewing Machine

By revolving cam-wheel B, the needle C and its thread are forced through the cloth on table L and the point of the needle coming in contact with slide H, the latter actuates lever I and loop former J, which catches the thread carried through the cloth and forms it into a loop over the point of the bobbin M, through the action of spring-catch N, the bobbin M being alternately retained and released by the two arms of the magnet K, as the thread is drawn between the bobbin and the magnet.

Claim: The attachment of the primary moving power to give motion to the needle in direct communication with the needle stock and in vertical line with the needle.

May 26, 1857

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US 17.400                            Thomas  S.  Wells

Sewing Machine

This invention relates to that class of sewing machines in which the sewing is effected by a needle with a point at each end passing entirely through the cloth to be sewed, from opposite sides alternately. The protruding portion of the finger l is caused by the rotation of the wheel  0 with the shaft E to pass between the point of the needle and the table A, at the precise moment when the needle has been withdrawn to the greatest distance from the cloth on the under side and catching hold of the thread forms a loop in it and by its continued revolution draws it through the cloth, doubling it and winding it upon the periphery of the wheel 0 till the stitch is drawn tight, when the drag of the thread on the finger I overcomes the force of the spring p and allows the finger to fall back far enough for it to slip off, as represented in dotted lines in fig. 2.

The inventor says: I do not claim the invention of a two-pointed needle with an eye in the centre, nor a two-pointed needle with a slit or fissure to receive and pinch the thread. Nor do I claim the employment of a revolving finger for the purpose of drawing the thread through the cloth, or any other device described in the specifications of Hezekiah B. Smith or J. J. Greenough. But I claim, first, the employment of a wheel o, to carry the finger L and take up the slack of the thread on its periphery as it is drawn through the cloth in tightening a stitch, substantially as and for the purpose specified. Second, enclosing the wheel o within a case R, substantially in the manner described, to prevent the thread slipping off the wheel and to guide the slack while it is being drawn through the cloth in the production of the successive stitches as set forth.

May 26, 1857

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JUNE 1857

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US 17.427                            James E. A.  Gibbs

Sewing Machine

This machine is intended to sew with a single thread. Claim:

1. The revolving hook described, constructed and arranged in relation to and operating in connexion with the needle, as set forth.

2. When sewing with a single thread, interlacing or twisting the threads of the loop after passing the cloth to be sewed and before taking a fresh loop.

June 2, 1857

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US 17.508                                Daniel  Harris

Sewing Machine

When the needle with its thread o, after having completed its downward motion, commences to rise, the heak point a is caused to enter between the thread and needle before the thread has any chance to twist. The thread, as the beak advances by the motion of arm C, is laid partially around the beak and is drawn over thread catch x  and when the plate projection p is brought against the end of spring h, the beak spreads the opening between the two portions of thread and the needle on its descent passes through the opening. When the needle in its next descent has penetrated the cloth and its point has just entered the loop, then the front of bar C begins to rock back, causing the spring h instantly to depress the plate b, so as to slacken the thread, which release allows the needle in its further descent to draw its thread in part from the slack of the preceding loop.

Claim: The mechanism for forming and interlooping the stitches, consisting of the beak a, the catch x, the plate b and its projection k, the spring h and the needle, when constructed, arranged and operated together in the manner as set forth.

June 9, 1857

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US 17.571                               Daniel  Harris

Sewing Machine

As the crank shaft G is rotated, a vibrating motion is imparted to lever E and connecting rod o and the sliding plate m is vibrated in its ways i k, resting upon plate p. When the plate m begins to move forward, the pin is in the front part of the oblique slot of the plate m and as said plate moves forward, it causes the pin n and looper rod c to move for ward until the point of the looper reaches its most outward position. The plate m, as it continues to move against pin n, causes the looper rod c to turn on its bearings until stud q strikes against bed p and to stop the rotary motion. As the plate next moves back, projection strikes against stud q and rotates the looper, so that the pin n shall again enter the rear part of the slot. The effect of these movements is, that when the needle B and its thread are upon their downward course and the point of the needle has just penetrated the cloth, the looper is at its most forward position, as seen in fig. 6, its nose being advanced past the path of the needle, its loop spreader t holding the loop of thread open in said path and the slot s also in said path. As soon as the needle has penetrated the cloth, it enters the loop spread out under it and as it continues, the loop rod rotates until the spreader t is turned at right angles to the table, when it is drawn back horizontally through its bearings, the needle ascending until the loop is fully pushed back. When thus pushed back, the nose of the looper is just against the side of the needle and in rear of the thread on the back of the needle and as the needle begins to rise, the thread slacks and the nose moves forward between the thread and the needle and as the point of the needle rises from under the table, the spreader, having the thread cast over it, rotates and spreads the thread ready for the next descent.

June 16, 1857

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US 17.679                Elias Howe Jr. & William R. Bliss

Sewing Machine

The subject-matter of our invention consists of certain improvements upon the sewing machine patented to Elias Howe, Jr., September 10, 1846, by means of which improvements the machine is better adapted to the sewing of leather and other similar hard substances and to the sewing of a certain class of objects to which the machine of the said Howe, as it was formerly arranged, is not applicable. The seam formed by this machine is of the same kind and is produced by the same general mode of operation as that described in said Howe's specification of September 10, 1846. The first part of our invention relates to an improvement in the manner in which the needle and shuttle are made to co-operate to interlock the threads and it consists in so modifying the mechanism and movements of them, respectively, as that the needle may be entirely withdrawn from the material to be sewed after it has inserted the loop, before the shuttle has passed through it. In the operation of said Howe's machine the shuttle is passed through the loop of the needle-thread while the needle is inserted, which sustains the loop under the operation of the shuttle and enables it to draw through so much of the needle thread as is requisite to permit its passage. In that case the thread is drawn through the material, while the needle also occupies the hole that is formed by it. In the sewing of elastic bodies, like cloth, this is not very objection able but in the sewing of leather it becomes necessary to use a comparatively large needle with deep grooves in the sides and a comparatively small thread, so that it can move past the needle when it is inserted and in this case, when the sewing is completed, the thread will be found not to fill the holes, which gives work a loose and infirm appearance; but in our machine a short and small needle is used, which passes the loop but a short distance through the material and the shuttle is formed with a slim pointed nose of a peculiar shape, which, in connection with a certain device to be hereinafter described, seizes the loop and holds it until the needle is withdrawn to the surface. The shuttle is then thrust through the loop and as the thread alone occupies the hole made by the needle it can be drawn freely through the same and at the same time be large enough to fill it. The stitch is then drawn up in the usual manner. The second part of our invention consists in a peculiar manner in which we have combined and arranged the baster and the mechanism which operates the shuttle and its thread, so that they may be contained and worked with in the compass of a small standard of a cylindrical or other convenient form, by means of which the machine is adapted to sew through the sides of objects of a tubular form-such as the legs of boots, hose and other things of a similar nature-provided that the aperture is of sufficient size to receive the standard. Having thus set forth our invention, what we claim as new and for which we ask Letters Patent, is:

1. In connection with the mode of forming a seam by means of two threads, as described the seizing and holding of the loop of the needle-thread after it is inserted by means of the point c of the shuttle and finger V, or their equivalent and the withdrawing of the needle from the material to be sewed before the shuttle-thread is passed through the loop, substantially in the manner and for the purpose described.

2. The combining and arranging of the mechanism which works the shuttle-thread and the baster, or its equivalent, with the standard C and in connection therewith so arranging the mechanism which works the needle-thread as that they shall co-operate and form the seam when the standard is inserted in objects of a tubular form, as is herein before described. Boston, August 23, 1853.

June 30, 1857

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US 17.717                                William  Sage

Sewing Machine

My invention consists in, first, combining a spring stop-plate with the needle and loop former to prevent the thread from getting be hind the needle and to insure the perfect action of the former in holding the stitch, as hereinafter set forth; second, giving the point of the loop-former an upward motion as the needle rises to its highest position to relieve the loop from strain and a return motion downward as the needle returns, as set forth; third, the construction of the former and its arrangement in connection with the auxiliary parts, by which its point is made to open as it rises to its highest position to receive the point of the needle within the loop and close when down to receive the next loop, as set forth. Claim:

1st. Combining the spring top plate with the needle and loop-former, as described, for the purpose set forth.

2d. Giving the point of the loop-former an upward motion as the needle rises and the point of the loop-former expands to form the loop, substantially as described and for the purpose stated.

3d. The construction of the loop-former and its arrangement in connexion with the trip h and slide N, by which it is made to open to spread the loop for the reception of the needle and close to. enter the next loop, as set forth.

Assignor to Henry Sage

June 30, 1857

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JULY 1857

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US 17.744                               E. T.  Lathbury

Sewing Machine

My invention consists in an improvement in the looper that operates, in combination with a needle and a single thread, to produce a chain-stitch, by which the liability of the needle to miss the loops is obviated.

I do not claim the employment of a looper with two fingers or a thumb and finger, as described in the patents of W. H. Johnson and L. Jennings, which fingers or thumb and finger operate differently to the fingers of my looper to produce a different stitch; but what I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is the looper composed of two elastic pointed fingers h, i and operating in combination with the needle, so that the needle passes through the looper while the loop is extended upon it, then escapes from it by opening its point as the looper is withdrawn from the loop, substantially as and for the purpose herein specified.

July 7, 1857

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US 17.835                            Abraham  Hoagland

Sewing Machine

July 21, 1857

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AUGUST 1857

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US 17.930                              Abial  C.  Herron

Sewing Machine

The engraving represents a bottom view of the mechanism for forming and taking up the loop. As the machine is operated, a reciprocating motion is given to the rod m, which, by means of its rack, imparts a reciprocating revolving motion to shaft k, by means of pinion a. The looping-hook i forms the loop on the thread carried through the cloth by the needle, said needle leaning during said operation against the circumference of the India rubber roller t, which is rotated by the motion of the needle. Thus the needle is held on one side by roller t, while the loop is taken up by hook i, thereby preventing any bending  of the needle ; and as the needle rises, the roller presses the thread through the eye of the needle, and aids in throwing it from the needle on the side opposite to the roller, to facilitate the hook in catching the thread.

The inventor says : I do not claim a rotating hook which has a longitudinal or transverse motion in the direction of its axis, in addition to its rotary motion. But I claim the hook h and roll t, arranged and operating in combination with the needle, in the manner substantially as described, for the purpose specified.

August 4, 1857

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US 18.000                           William  C.  Watson

Sewing Machine

My invention consists of an improved loop er for single-thread, or what is more commonly known as chain-stitch machines. The great defect in these machines has been the want of certainty in seizing the loop and in holding it in proper position for the passage of the needle through it. By my improvement the loop is, in the first instance, caught, as the needle retreats, upon an advancing hook which enters it and having affixed to the shank of said hook a gripping finger, which is made immediately to close over the loop, whereby that is held firmly in place during the retreat of the hook to the position it must necessarily have in order that the needle may pass through when that again descends, immediately after which passing the gripping-finger opens and the loop slips off, the stitch being thereby finished, as usual.

Assignor to himself, George H. Wooster and Ira W. Gregory

August 11, 1857

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US 18.068                          William  Wickersham

Sewing Machine

August 25, 1857 

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US 18.069                          William  Wickersham

Sewing Machine

August 25, 1857

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US 18.071                                Henry  Behn

Sewing Machine

Assignor to himself and Thomas Sewell

August 25, 1857

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US 18.072                              Samuel  Larkin

Sewing Machine Thread Tension

Assignor to The Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Company

August 25, 1857

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OCTOBER 1857

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US 18.350            Willford H. Nettleton & Charles Raymond

Sewing Machine

The nature of our said invention consists in a peculiar construction of feed-motion to move the material that is being sewed. What we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is the spring bed-plate q, in combination with the pressure clamp o and inclined spring-fingers r, to feed the cloth, substantially as specified. In witness whereof we have hereunto set our signatures this 10th day of September 1857.

October 6, 1857

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US 18.359                              E. Harry  Smith

Sewing Machine

October 6, 1857

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US 18.371                           William  C.  Watson

Sewing Machine

The nature of my invention consists in the making of an improved looper for single thread or chain-stitch sewing machines, the object aimed at being the obtaining of greater certainty of action with simplicity of parts. The principle of my looper lies in a peculiar combination of two hooks, one of which is stationary and the other movable, which latter I call the “loop-carrying hook and which is to catch and carry the loop to one side, where it is held open for the passage of the needle by the combined action of both hooks. 

Assignor to himself, George H. Wooster and Ira W. Gregory

October 6, 1857

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US 18.470                           T. J. W.  Robertson

Sewing Machine

This improvement consists, first, in a new stitch, which I call the “double back-stitch, which is made as follows:

Pass a loop of thread through the fabric to be sewed; then pass through the fabric and through the first loop (from the same side of the fabric as the first loop) another loop from another thread; then pass through the fabric another loop from the first thread through its own first loop and the loop of the second thread.

The second part of my invention consists in a machine for making the foregoing-described stitch by means of two needles working at such angles to each other that they cross be neath the table and work through each other's loops. 

I do not claim, broadly, the employment of two needles for the purpose of sewing cloth, for they are seen in the patents of O. Avery, October 19, 1852, to May 9, 1854.

October 20, 1857

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DECEMBER 1857

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US 18.732                                 Joel  Chase

Feed-Motion of Sewing Machine

My invention consists in a certain combination and arrangement of parts, hereinafter described, for causing the needle to feed the cloth forward, as hereinafter more fully set forth. In this invention the cam wheel E is made with a waved or undulating rim to give motion to the needle arm G. The needle arm is hung in a socket in the rock shaft H, which is hung in bearings in the frame. This needle arm fits closely into the socket and is kept from turning by friction any further than it is compelled to turn by the arm 1, which is attached to the lower end of the part which fits into the socket This arm is restricted in its motion by the stop J and may also be restricted in its opposite motion by the lever K. It is also kept from moving more than a proper distance by the stop L in the socket. I claim the combination of the lever G, when hung on an axis in the rock-shaft, with the lever I, when the motion thereof is limited by the stops, in the manner set forth, for the purpose of imparting the feed motion to the needle.

December 1, 1857

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US 18.793                               George  Fetter

Sewing Machine

Assignor to himself and Edward Jones

December 1, 1857

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US 18.807                                John  Devlin

Sewing Thimble

December 8, 1857

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US 18.834                           William  C.  Watson

Sewing Machines

This invention consists in the employment, in a sewing machine, of a stationary needle combined in such a manner with a reciprocating table or cloth-holder that the protrusion of the needle through the cloth or material being sewed is caused by the movement of the said material, by which means several advantages are obtained over the use of a reciprocating needle and stationary table or cloth-holder. 

Assignor to himself and Geo H. Wooster

December 8, 1857

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US 18.845                              James  Hanley

Mechanical movement for Sewing and other Machines

The claim and engraving explain the nature of this invention. The inventor says: I do not claim the mere stopping of a machine by the intervention of a brake, as this is already done in several ways, by pawls, clutches, and tightening bands. But I claim the roller r, moving in a conical recess and brought into action both to hold and release automatically, by the friction of its surface contact with and by the motion of the machine, substantially in the manner and for the purpose set forth.

December 15, 1857

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US 18.911              Charles D. Kellogg & William L. Coan

Glass Knob for Door

December 22, 1857

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Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the Year 1857