Annual report of the Commissioner of Patents for the year 1874 in not downloadable on line yet.

 

US PATENTS IN 1874

Number of applications for patents during the year .......................... 21.602

Number of patents issued, including reissues and designs .................. 13.599

Number of applications for extension of patents ...................................... 216

Number of patents extended ................................................................ 199

Number of caveats filed during the year .............................................. 3.181

Number of patents expired during the year .......................................... 4.908

Number of patents allowed but not issued for want of final fee ............... 2.561

Number of applications for registration of trademarks .............................. 648

Number of trademarks registered ........................................................ 559

Number of applications for registering of labels ....................................... 221

Number of labels registered .................................................................. 151

 

 

Of the patents granted there were to Citizens of the United States ........ 13.072

Subjects of Great Britain ...................................................................... 352

Subjects of France ................................................................................ 74

Subjects of other foreign governments ................................................... 101

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JANUARY 1874

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US 158.350 

US 146.120                            year first patent                  January 6, 1874

        12.230 patents

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US 146.120                        Oscar  J.  Backus

Water Motor for Sewing Machine

This invention has for its object:

First. The construction of a waste-water pocket, an induction-nozzle and a discharge-nozzle by casting them on one of the plates constituting the casing which incloses the wheel.

Second. Forming in the center of each casing-plate an annular internal depression surrounding an extended wheel-shaft bearing.

Third. Casting a bracket-extension on the external side of one of the plates of the wheel-casing, which shall serve not only for attaching the motor onto the top of a sewing machine table, but at its upper end form a bearing for the motor-shaft.

Fourth. The employment of a drip-pan beneath the pedal-cock, constructed so as to serve not only the purpose of a drip-pan, but also as a support for the water-cock and treadle.

Fifth. The application of a detachable strainer-vessel to the water-supply pipe at a point between the injecting-nozzle and the treadle-cock, which vessel is of an enlarged capacity as compared with the diameter of the supply-pipe to which it is attached.

what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The single casing-plate A, having an induction-nozzle, a waste-water pocket and a discharge-nozzle formed thereon, substantially as and for the purpose described.

2. The annular chamber m, between plates A A1, surrounding the elongated bearings for the wheel-shaft c, substantially as described.

3. The bracket extension A3, cast on the plate A, below the wheel-shaft c, so as to serve not only as a bracket, but at its upper end form a bearing for the motor-shaft c, substantially as described.

4. A drip-pan F, constructed with standards f to support the water-cock L and treadle T thus serving the purpose of a waste-water receptacle, as well as a support for said cock d treadle, substantially as shown.

5. An enlarged detachable vessel N, with a perforated diaphragm therein, arranged and applied to the pipe P between the nozzle P1 and the treadle-cock L, substantially as and for the purpose described.

January 6, 1874

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US 146.185                             John  T. Jones

Hemming Attachment for Sewing Machine

January 6, 1874

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US 146.280                          Timothy  K.  Reed

Wire-Lock-Stitch Sewing Machine

Assignor to Arza  B. Keith, Trustee

January 6, 1874

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US 146.289                       Joseph  A.  Stansbury 

Adjustable Caster for Sewing Machine

Assignor of 1/2 his Right to Solomon  Blim

January 6, 1874

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US 146.298                     Wellington  C.  Wendell

Cover for Sewing Machine

Assignor to 1/2 his Right to John W. Francis

January 6, 1874

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US 146.359                          Alfred  H.  Race

Preventing Back Motion in Sewing Machines

January 13, 1874

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US 146.362                              John   Rigby

Shuttles for Loom

January 13, 1874

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US 146.377                          Francis  W.  Brown

Tucker for Sewing Machine

January 13, 1874

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US 146.466                              Adam  Moltz

Sewing Machine

January 13, 1874

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US 146.482                            Louis  Schultz

Ruffler for Sewing Machine

This invention consists of two jaws, pivoted upon an arm, projecting from the presser-foot of a sewing machine and made to oscillate on said pivotal bearing and open and close as the needle-bar reciprocates, through the medium of a bell-crank lever, that has its fulcrum on the pivotal bearing of the jaws. Thus, by imparting to said bell-crank lever an oscillating motion, the jaws or nippers are caused to swing toward and from the presser-foot and thereby form ruffles or plaits on the material as it passes between the jaws, as will be fully hereinafter described. The invention further consists in providing the oscillating jaws with supporting-lips, to carry the band which is to be sewed to the plaited material. 

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The jaws B, pivoted upon the plate a and made to oscillate thereon and open and close as the needle-bar reciprocates, by means of the bell-crank levers i j and d, e, stud c and lever, l, connected with the needle-bar, all constructed and arranged in the described combination herein shown and described.

2. The nippers B, having the lips m, for supporting a braid during the operation of sewing the same to the ruffled material, in combination with the plate a, bell-crank levers i j and d, e and the lever l, connected with the needle-bar, substantially as described.

January 13, 1874

Reissued

March 17, 1874        US RE 5.793

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US 146.483                      Benjamin  Scribner Jr.

Sewing Machine

January 13, 1874

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US 146.502                        John  H.  Applegate

Sewing Machine

January 20, 1874

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US 146.505                       William  G.  Beckwith

Sewing Machine

January 20, 1874

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US 146.561                               John  West

Thread-Cutter for Sewing Machine

  January 20, 1874

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US 146.628                        John  L.  Woodruff

Needle-Sharpener for Sewing Machine

January 20, 1874

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US 146.642                          Samuel  S.  Black

Sewing Machine

Assignor of 3/4 his Right to John Black, Samuel Black and L. C.  Black

January 20, 1874

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US 146.679                         George  W.  Hunter

Sewing Machine

Assignor of 1/2 his Right to William F. Stone, Henry M. Baker and James H. Vermilya

January 20, 1874

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US 146.684                          John  F.  Johnson

Hemmers for Sewing Machine

January 20, 1874

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US 146.721                       Fenner  Ballou  Taylor

Sewing Machine

January 20, 1874

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US 146.736                            William  Wilson

Corders for Sewing Machine

January 20, 1874

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US 146.747                      Frederick  H.  Bradley

Machines for polishing the eyes of Needles

January 27, 1874

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US 146.761                             Leo  Griswold

Sewing Machine

January 27, 1874

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US 146.780                        Abraham  Provancha

Treadle Movements for Sewing Machine

Assignor to himself and Jeremiah Elliott

January 27, 1874

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US 146.889                        Jerome  F.  Downing

Ladies Sewing-Chair

January 27, 1874

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US 146.948                      Everett  P.  Richardson

Machine for Sewing Hose

January 27, 1874

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US 146.970                      William  Henry  Wright

Fringing Machine

The object of my invention is to automatically make and attach a fringe to the edge of a shawl or other garment. My invention is illustrated, in the present instance, as applied to an ordinary Singer sewing-machine, of the kind used for heavy work.

January 27, 1874

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FEBRUARY 1874

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US 146.988             John B. Church  &  John  C. Driscoll

Lamp Attachments for Sewing Machine

 February 3, 1874

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US 146.994             Napoleon Dubrul  &  Cyriac  Dubrul

Treadle for Sewing Machine

February 3, 1874

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US 146.997                          George  W.  Eddy

Sewing Machine Casters

assignor to J. Stanley Rood & Annie M. Goodwin

February 3, 1874

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US 147.062

February 3, 1874

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US 147.075

February 3, 1874

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US 147.076

February 3, 1874

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US 147.123

February 3, 1874

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US 147.148

February 3, 1874

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US 147.152

February 3, 1874

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US 147.153

February 3, 1874

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US 147.372

February 10, 1874

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US 147.377

February 10, 1874

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US 147.387

February 10, 1874

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US 147.415

February 10, 1874

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US 147.441

February 10, 1874

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US 147.463

February 10, 1874

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US 147.469

February 17, 1874

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US 147.572

February 17, 1874

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US 147.574

February 17, 1874

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US 147.578

February 17, 1874

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US 147.672

February 17, 1874

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US 147.772

February 24, 1874

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US 147.970

February 24, 1874

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US 147.981

February 24, 1874

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US 147.987

February 24, 1874

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MARCH 1874

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US 148.024

Shuttle Sewing Machine

March 3, 1874

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US 148.025

March 3, 1874

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US 148.047

March 3, 1874

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US 148.048

March 3, 1874

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US 148.072

March 3, 1874

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US 148.110               Moses  Cook  &  Moses G. Cook

Bobbin Winder for Sewing Machine

March 3, 1874

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US 148.135

March 3, 1874

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US 148.182

March 3, 1874

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US 148.189

March 3, 1874

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US 148.192

March 3, 1874

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US 148.225

March 3, 1874

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US 148.336

March 10, 1874

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US 148.339

March 10, 1874

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US 148.388

March 10, 1874

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US 148.400

March 10, 1874

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US 148.457

March 10, 1874

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US 148.511

March 10, 1874

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US 148.640

March 17, 1874

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US 148.759

March 17, 1874

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US 148.761                          Reuben  M.  Rose

Embroidery Attachment to Sewing Machine

March 17, 1874

Reissued

August 11, 1874        US RE 6.005

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US 148.765

March 17, 1874

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US 148.773

March 17, 1874

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US 148.902

March 24, 1874

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US 148.933

March 24, 1874

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US 148.937

March 24, 1874

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US 148.959

March 24, 1874

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US 149.034

March 31, 1874

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US 149.110

March 31, 1874

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US 149.115

March 31, 1874

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US 149.155

March 31, 1874

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US 149.192

March 31, 1874

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US 149.272

March 31, 1874

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APRIL 1874

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US 149.862                   Addison D. Horr

April 21, 1874

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MAY 1874

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US 150.479                        Chas  Page

May 5, 1874

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US 150.532                     Thomas   Crane

May 5, 1874

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US 150.931

 

May 19, 1874

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US 151.272                             J.    Buhr

May 26, 1874

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JUNE 1874

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US 151.801                           D.  M.  Smyth

June 9, 1874

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US 152.055                         James  Wensley

June 16, 1874

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US 152.618               A. S. Dinsmore  &  John T. Carter

June 30, 1874

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JULY 1874

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US 152.813                              John  Speirs

Sewing Machine

Assignor to himself and Henry F. Cox

July 7, 1874

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US 152.894                          A. G. Brewer

July 14, 1874

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US 153.093                         Jonathan  Leonard

Knitting Machine

July 14, 1874

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US 153.116                          Israel  M.  Rose

Embroidery Attachment to Sewing Machine

Assignor to Joseph  I.  West

July 14, 1874

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US 153.117                          Israel  M.  Rose

Embroidery Attachment to Sewing Machine

Assignor to Joseph  I.  West

July 14, 1874

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US 153.210                          Theodore   Weber

Sewing Machine

July 21, 1874

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US 153.468                           Alfred  Tostevin

Ladies Sewing-Cabinet

July 28, 1874

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AUGUST 1874

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US 153.767                             John  Happe

Sewing Machine for Quilting

August 4, 1874

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US 153.718                            Ira  Manning

Attachment for Sewing Machine

Assignor to Melancthon S. Frink

August 4, 1874

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US 153.728               John O. Sloan  &  Quincy A. Fisk

Caster for Sewing Machine

August 4, 1874

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US 153.733                       Cyrus  A.  Werden

Portable, Self-Sustaining, Folding, Sewing and Cutting Stand

Assignor to himself and William B. Werden

August 4, 1874

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US 154.084                           George  Rehfuss

Sewing Machine

Assignor to

American Button-Hole Overseaming and Sewing Machine Company

August 11, 1874

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US 154.088                           Reuben  M.  Rose

Embroidery Attachment to Sewing Machine

August 11, 1874

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US 154.113                              William  Baglin

Guide for Sewing Machine

Assignor to himself and William E. Doubleday

August 18, 1874

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US 154.115                           Edwin  E.  Bean

Wax-Thread Sewing Machine

August 18, 1874

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US 154.117                           Robert  Blake

Shuttle for Sewing Machine

August 18, 1874

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US 154.167         William G. Anderson  &  George G. Childs

Side Drawers for Sewing Machine

August 18, 1874

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US 154.173                          Stephen  A.  Davis

Braiding and Cording Attachment for Sewing Machine

Assignor to Robert Blake

August 18, 1874

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US 154.256                           John  T.  Jones

Treadle for Sewing Machine, &c.

August 18, 1874

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US 154.291                           Edwin  D.  Smith

Sewing Machine

Assignor to Howe Machine Company

August 18, 1874

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US 154.311                       Francis  R.  Wolfinger

Case for Sewing Machine

August 18, 1874

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US 154.385                           Gibbons  Frame

Sewing Machine

Assignor to Oscar F. Davis

August 25, 1874

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US 154.485                          Elijah  L.  Howard

Hem-Stitching Attachment to Sewing Machine

August 25, 1874

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US 154.497                         William  H.  Lewitt

Ruffler for Sewing Machine

August 25, 1874

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SEPTEMBER 1874

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US 154.646                        Jehial  H.  Cleveland

Tucker for Sewing Machine

September 1, 1874

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US 155.120

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US 155.133

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US 155,193                      William  R.  Landfear

September 22, 1874

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US 155.253                        Aaron  Morehouse

Machine for Sewing Sweat-Leathers into Hats

September 22, 1874

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US 155.334                          Henry  Parsons

Trimming or Cutting Attachments for Sewing Machine

September 22, 1874

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US 155.471                          John  Sigwalt Jr.

Treadle Mechanism for Sewing Machine

My invention relates to the driving mechanism shown and described in Letters Patent US 142.544, dated September 2, 1873, and issued to Edmund Wright, for improvements in the mode of operating sewing machines. My object is to improve the construction and operation of this device and to that end my invention consists in extending the pawls into levers, the outer ends of which I connect to the driving-cord. I also provide the sleeve with a removable arm, which may be rigidly attached thereto and in this arm I arrange an adjustable ring or thimble to receive the crank arm of that class of machines driven by means of a crank extending from the driving-wheel; also, I provide with a head-piece the springs which rest against the pawls and I suspend the anti-friction wheel from the bearing on which the sleeve rests. What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The yielding levers D and D, connected to the driving-cord and pivoted to the pulleys C and C', loosely mounted on the grooved sleeve B, all operating together substantially as specified and for the purposes set forth.

2. The removable arm I, attached to the sleeve B and provided with the thimble or ring I', set to one side of the center of a pin resting freely in a socket in the end of the said arm, substantially as and for the purposes specified.

3. The head-pieces H H, playing in the sockets E E and arranged between the springs and the levers D and D', substantially as and for the purposes specified.

September 29, 1874

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OCTOBER 1874

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US 155.885                           William  H.  Null

Quilting Attachment for Sewing Machine

I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. The revolving cross-pieces E, adjustable legs F, braces G and cross-bars H, combined and arranged in the benches, as described, for adjusting and holding the benches.

2. The combination of the fiction-band N, brake-lever O and holding-pawl P, with the quilt-rollers, for regulating the tension of the quilt, substantially as specified.

3. The stretching-hooks S, cords T, lever U and guides for the cords, combined and ar ranged to stretch the quilt simultaneously a both ends, substantially as specified. 

October 13, 1874

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US 155.886                           William  H.  Null

Quilting Attachment for Sewing Machine

I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. The quilting-rollers, arranged to be lifted out of the bearings in beam B' and the hangers D, arranged to swing the beam over the sewing machine to pass a roller under the sewing machine arm, substantially as specified.

2. The friction belt or chain L, tightening pulley K, regulating-wheel M. N and spring arm O, combined with the quilt-rollers, substantially as specified.

October 13, 1874

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US 155.932                               Ellis  Drake

October 13, 1874

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US 155.976                       Joseph  W.  Robards

Hemmer Attachment for Sewing Machine

The nature of my invention consists in the construction and arrangement of a sewing machine attachment or hemmer having an adjustable gage or guide for making different width hems without basting and it may be also used as a trimmer for putting on different widths of braid or any flat trimming with ease and regularity. What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

The combination of the L-shaped arm A, provided with the mortise a and catch d, the slotted plate B, provided with the arm B3, prongs B1 B2 and slot b' and the slide D, all substantially as and for the purposes herein set fort.

October 13, 1874

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US 156,119                    Samuel  C.  Barney

October 20, 1874

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US 156.161                       James  W.  Huntoon

Motor for Sewing Machine

The nature of my invention consists in the construction of an automatic sewing machine in connection with a mechanical motive-power, which power sets in effectual motion the working parts of the machine. Also, in the application of a spring-brake, which may be faced with leather or other suitable material for regulating the speed of the machine at the will of the operator and for stopping the machine instantly when desired. Also, in so arranging the aforesaid motive-power, by the addition of extra couplings, that it can be easily applied and used as a motive-power to sewing machines of other forms and manufacture and, also, in the construction and combination of parts, as will be hereinafter more fully set forth. My motive-power and mode of applying the same entirely supersedes and dispenses with the foot-treadle and crank and saves nearly all the labor of running sewing machines and the machine may be run as slowly as desired, or much more rapidly than a lady can run it with a foot-treadle. What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. In combination with a train of gearing operated by one or more springs, a movable box adjusted on a circle and carrying a shaft with a pinion to connect with the gearing and an eccentric, or its equivalent, for operating a sewing machine, substantially as herein set forth.

2. In combination with a train of gearing run by one or more springs for operating a sewing machine, the brake consisting of the brake-shoe J, springs and eccentric corrugated lever K, substantially as and for the purposes herein set forth.

3. In combination with the brake, the shaft t with arm v, weighted rod w and spring-shoe L, substantially as and for the purposes herein set forth.

October 20, 1874

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US 156,171                           Eugene  Moreau

Sewing Machine

Assignor to Moreau Machine Manufacturing Company

The nature of my invention consists in the construction and arrangement of the parts of a sewing machine. What I claim as my invention is:

1. The combination of the hooks E F, cams E' G', frame G and guide f", substantially as and for the purpose described.

2. The combination of the hooks E F, cams E' G', guide f" and spring f"' with the shuttle D, the pin p3 on the shuttle-frame and the pin p4 on the under side of the bed-plates A, all substantially as set forth.

3. The combination of the shuttle, having hollow tube through its center, the rods d d' separated from each other in the center, the hooks E F, cams E' G', frame G, guide f" and spring f"', all substantially as set forth.

October 20, 1874

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NOVEMBER 1874

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US 156.728                          Chaim  Groubman

Sewing Machine

November 10, 1874

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US 156.863                        C. H. Waterhouse

Attachment holder for Sewing Machine

November 17, 1874

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US 156.892                    Rickart, Dexter & Lane

Braider for Sewing Machine

November 17, 1874

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US 156.933                              L. Mangus

Shuttle for Sewing Machine

November 17, 1874

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US 157.017                              C. H. Mason

Sewing Machine

November 17, 1874

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DECEMBER 1874

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US 158.054

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US 158.167                       George  A.  Fairfield

Needle Bar and Holder for Sewing Machine

Assignor to Weed Sewing Machine Company

The object of my invention is to improve the efficiency of sewing machines and to furnish a needle-bar and needle-holder, whereby a straight needle adapted for one machine may be used in any other machine employing a straight needle. My invention consists in combining, with a socket-piece for holding the needle and with the needle-bar for holding such socket-piece, a single set-screw, serving to hold the needle to the piece and the piece to the bar, as herein after described and it further consists in connecting, with an axial bore in the needle-bar, a lateral opening communicating there with, to facilitate the removal of the socket-piece from the bar, as hereinafter set forth. I claim:

1. In combination with the socket-piece B and with the needle-bar, the single set-screw h, applied as described and serving both to hold the needle in the socket-piece and to hold the socket-piece in the needle-bar.

2. The needle-bar, having a large axial bore to receive a removable needle-holding socket piece or plug and the lateral opening g, lead ing into the axial bore, substantially as and for the purpose set forth.

December 29, 1874

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US 158.214                      Thomas  S.  Huntington

December 29, 1874

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US 158.231

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US 158.349                               last patent                   December 29, 1874

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REISSUED IN 1874

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US RE 3.390

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US RE 5.728       Edmund Howard  &  William H. Jackson

Button-Holing and Overseaming Attachments for Sewing Machine

Assignors, by Mesne Assignments, to Henry E. Townsend, Charles P. Brigham & George W. Simmons

January 13, 1874

Specification forming part of Letters Patent

US 103.745                              May 31, 1870

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US RE 5.793                           Louis  Schultz

Ruffler for Sewing Machine

This invention consists of two jaws pivoted upon an arm projecting from the presser-foot of a sewing machine and made to oscillate on said pivoted bearing and open and close as the needle-bar reciprocates, through the medium of a bell-crank lever, that has its fulcrum on the pivoted bearing of the jaws; further, in providing the oscillating jaws with supporting-lips to carry the band which is to be sewed to the plaited or ruffled material; also, in combining with the ruffling device a double hemmer, so that the edges of the band are tucked under, while the material to which the band is to be sewed is ruffled, all one operation and that the band when sewed to the ruffled material presents a finished appearance. What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The jaws B, pivoted upon the plate a and made to oscillate thereon and open and close as the needle-bar reciprocates, by means of the bell-crank levers i j and d e, stud c and lever l connected with the needle-bar, all constructed and arranged in the combination herein shown and described.

2. The nippers B, having the lips m for supporting a band during the operation of sewing the same to the ruffled material, in combination with the plate a, bell-crank levers i j and d e and the lever l, connected with the needle bar, substantially as described.

3. The combination of ruffling-blades, operating substantially as described, with double hemmers or lips m adapted to move back and forth with said blades in front of the presser foot and serving to tuck under both edges of a band which is to be sewed to the plaited material, essentially as specified. 

Specification forming part of Letters Patent

US 146.482                        January 13, 1874

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US RE 6.003              Friedrick Koch  &  Robert Brass

Sewing Machine

Assignors to John Boyle

August 11, 1874

Specification forming part of Letters Patent

US 138.898                               May 13, 1873

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US RE 6.005                       Reuben  M.  Rose

Embroidery Attachment to Sewing Machine

Assignor to The Nonpareil Embroider Company

August 11, 1874

Specification forming part of Letters Patent

US  148.761                          March 17, 1874

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US RE 6.056                        John  C.  Vetter

Table and Folding Cover of Sewing Machine

September 22, 1874

Specification forming part of Letters Patent

US 134.496                    December 31, 1872

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US RE 6.118                         William  A.  Mack

Vibrating Shuttle Sewing Machine

Assignor to the Domestic Sewing Machine Company

The nature of my invention relates, first, to the devices for throwing the shuttle; second, to the construction of the shuttle and shuttle. race and, third, to the devices for driving the feed-wheel. What I claim, as my improvement and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The universal joint formed by the union of the arms J and K with the socket L, these several parts being constructed, arranged and operated as all for the purpose specified.

2. The shuttle N, in combination with the curved shuttle race M, having an angular trough, when both the shuttle and race are constructed, arranged and operated substantially as set forth.

3. The arm P', grip P , spring R and wheel O', when these parts are constructed, arranged and operated substantially as and for the purpose specified.

November 3. 1874

Specification forming part of Letters Patent

US 38.592                                May 19, 1863

 

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US RE 6.142                        William A. Springer

Trimming Attachment for Sewing Machine

Only so much of one style of sewing machines, as is necessary to illustrate my said improvements is shown, as the skill of an ordinary mechanic will be sufficient to apply, it to the different styles of sewing machines to which it is adapted. My invention relates to attachments for trimming seams on sewing machines and it consists in the combination and arrangement of the parts hereinafter described and claimed. The object of my invention is to trim the seam of the fabric sewed in a sewing machine by a rotary cutter, which, for motion, does not depend on the force of the feed, to the detriment of the same, and of the fabric, which is easily caused to run in curves. The trimming-shaft receives motion from the main shaft of the sewing machine and thereby aids the feed-motion in its performance, provided the knife is kept sharp, since, the motion of the cutter has a tendency to move the upper part of the material being sewed in the direction of the feed. What I claim therein as new and of my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. The combination, with the rotary trimming-knife and its supporting shaft and bearings, movable toward and away from the work plate, as described, of an elevating-spring, operating to raise the knife clear of the work and a depressing or locking device, operating to hold the knife down upon the work against the pressure of the spring, substantially as set forth.

2. In a sewing machine trimmer, the combination, with the plate H, provided with a slot h, of the hinged pressure or bearing plate I, the depressing and locking or clamping calm-lever N, rotating shaft J and circular cutter K, substantially as and for the purposes set forth.

November 17. 1874

Specification forming part of Letters Patent

US 142.290                          August 26, 1873

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EXTENSIONS GRANTED IN 1874

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US 26.906                         Albert  F.  Johnson

Stitch for Sewing Cloth, Leather, &c.

January 24, 1860

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Application has been duly filed and is now pending for the extension

US 27.179                         Calvin  D.  Wheeler

Marking Gage for Sewing Machine

February 14, 1860

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Application has been duly filed and is now pending for the extension

US 27.594                              L. W. Langdon

March 20, 1860

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Application has been duly filed and is now pending for the extension

US 27.620                                  J. Davis

March 27, 1860

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US 28.852                             J. J.  Greenough

Pegging Machine

June 26, 1860

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US 29.035                                 John  First

Sewing Machine

July 3, 1860

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US 29.561

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US 29.562

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US 29.648

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US 29.785

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Application has been duly filed and is now pending for the extension

US 31.203                          Francis  D.  Ballou

Boot & Shoe Sewing Machine

January 22, 1861

199 - whole number 31.203 Sewing Machines - granted to Francis D. Ballou, January 22, 1861 - reissued March 31, 1868. Application filed October 22, 1874. Testimony closes December 22, 1874. Hearing January 6, 1875.

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US PATENTS IN ...

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1851   1852   1853   1854   1855   1856   1857   1858   1859   1860  

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The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)

Google Patents

Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the Year 1874

 

 

 

5.  Number of patents issued by the United States Patent Office 

to residents of the different States, Territories, and foreign 

countries from January 1, 1874, to December 31, 1874.



States, etc.         No. of     One to 

                     Patents    Every



Alabama                   39   25,564

Arkansas                  14    3,465

California               301    1,861

Colorado Territory        22    1,812

Connecticut              668      804

Dakota Territory           4    3,543

Delaware                  39    3,205

District of Columbia     145      901

Florida                   12   15,645

Georgia                   69   17,161

Illinois                 944    2,478

Indiana                  355    4,762

Iowa                     312    3,506

Kansas                    74    4,924

Kentucky                 125   10,568

Louisiana                 76    9,556

Maine                    151    4,151

Maryland                 218    3,578

Massachusetts          1,506      960

Michigan                 380    3,110

Minnesota                110    3,997

Mississippi               56   14,784

Missouri                 306    5,625

Montana Territory          1   20,595

Nebraska                  29    4,241

Nevada                    16    2,675

New Hampshire            127    2,506

New Jersey               616    1,471

New York               2,785    1,581

North Carolina            47   22,811

Ohio                     928    2,872

Oregon                    30    3,031

Pennsylvania           1,644    2,142

Rhode Island             164    1,325

South Carolina            42   16,860

Tennessee                 89   14,027

Texas                    113    7,244

Utah Territory             9    9,642

Vermont                  126    2,625

Virginia                  71   17,255

Washington Territory       4    5,926

West Virginia             38   11,632

Wisconsin                255    4,136

Wyoming Territory          4    2,279

Great Britain            352       --

France                    74       --

Other countries          101       --

United States Army         7       --

United States Navy         1       --

United States in general  --    2,556





6.  Comparative statement of the business of the Office from 1837 to 1874, inclusive



Years Applica- Caveats Patents   Cash        Cash

       tions    Filed  Issued   Received    Expended



1837                     435  $29,289.08  $33,506.98

1838                     520   42,123.54   37,402.10

1839                     425   37,260.00   34,543.51

1840     765    228      473   38,056.51   39,020.67

1841     847    312      495   40,413.01   52,666.87

1842     761    391      517   36,505.68   31,241.48

1843     819    315      531   35,315.81   30,766.96

1844   1,045    380      502   42,509.26   36,244.73

1845   1,246    452      502   51,076.14   39,395.65

1846   1,272    448      619   50,264.16   46,158.71

1847   1,531    553      572   63,111.19   41,878.35

1848   1,628    607      660   67,576.69   58,905.84

1849   1,955    595    1,070   80,752.78   77,716.44

1850   2,193    602      995   86,927.05   80,100.95

1851   2,258    760      869   95,738.61   86,916.93

1852   2,639    996    1,020  112,656.34   95,916.91

1853   2,673    901      958  121,527.45  132,869.83

1854   3,324    868    1,902  163,789.84  167,146.32

1855   4,435    906    2,024  216,459.35  179,540.33

1856   4,960  1,024    2,502  192,588.02  199,931.02

1857   4,771  1,010    2,910  196,132.01  211,582.09

1858   5,364    943    3,710  203,716.16  193,193.74

1859   6,225  1,097    4,538  245,942.15  210,278.41

1860   7,653  1,084    4,819  256,352.59  252.820.80

1861   4,643    700    3,340  137,354.44  221,491.91

1862   5,038    824    3,521  215,754.99  182,810.39

1863   6,014    787    4,170  195,593.29  189,414.14

1864   6,972  1,063    5,020  240,919.98  229,868.00

1865  10,664  1,937    6,616  348,791.84  274,199.34

1866  15,269  2,723    9,450  495,665.38  361,724.28

1867  21,276  3,597   13,015  646,581.92  639,263.32

1868  20,420  3,705   13,378  684,565.86  628,679.77

1869  19,271  3,624   13,986  693,145.81  486,430.78

1870  19,171  3,273   13,321  669,476.76  557,149.19

1871  19,472  3,624   13,033  678,716.46  560.595.08

1872  18,246  3,090   13,590  699,726.39  665,591.36

1873  20,414  3,248   12,864  703,191.77  691,178.98

1874  21,602  3,181   13,599  728,278.17  679,288.41

The business of the Office during 1874 presents several interesting features. From the above statement it will be seen that, notwithstanding the general prostration of business, a larger number of applications was received during the year 1874 than in any preceding year; and a larger number of patents was granted than in any year before, with the exception of 1869. It also appears that 2,561 applications were allowed, but patents were not issued, because the final fee was not paid within six months, as the law requires. If this number be added to the number of patents issued, it will be seen that of the 21,602 applications filed during the year 16,160 were allowed, leaving only a little more than one-fourth of the entire number of applications finally rejected. The fact that nearly three-fourths of the applications were finally decided favorably to the petitioners is a sufficient answer to the inconsiderate charge sometimes made of illiberality on the part of the officials of the Patent Office.

I desire, also, to call attention to the fact that, notwithstanding the heavy expenditures of the Office for photolithographing the drawings of current and back issues and for the publication of the Gazette, the excess of receipts over expenditures during the year amounts to $58,989.76, an increase of $46,976.97 over and above the surplus of the year immediately preceding.

Expenses of the Office

An examination of table 6 will show that for the last eight years the average number of applications for patents has been about 20,000 per annum. It is probable that this may be expected as the average annual business of the Office for years to come, unless some great change should occur affecting directly the operation and influence of our patent system. Should the business keep up to the present standard, however,it will not materially increase the expenses of the Office. The photolithographing of the drawings of current and back issues has so facilitated the labor of making examination that the same force can do very much more and much better work than ten years ago. This is accomplished by putting into each examiner's room a full set of the photolithographs of his class as soon as the work is completed, so that his examinations, to the extent of patents granted in this country, can be made without leaving his room, and yet with a certainty that all the drawings in the class are before him. The full benefit of the reproduction of old drawings cannot be realized, however, until the work is entirely completed. It will be of great advantage, not only to the Patent Office, but also to the public, if this can be speedily accomplished. I have recommended, therefore, an increase of the appropriation for this purpose for the next fiscal year. If the amount asked for, one hundred thousand dollars, is appropriated, it will enable the Commissioner to complete the work within the year. The sale of copies will be largely increased by having in store photolithographs of the drawings of all patents, thus enlarging the receipts of the Office, while at the same time the facilities for examining applications will be improved to such an extent that, I am confident, the working force of the Office can be decreased by dispensing with one entire grade of the examining corps. A large saving in the annual expenses of the Office will thus be effected, while the increase in appropriation desired is only about one thousand dollars more than the surplus receipts for the last year.

Of course the annual increase of patents granted adds just so much to the labor of examining subsequent applications; but, with the completion of the reproduction of the old drawings, and the improvements in working facilities in other particulars, which may be obtained, it is hoped that this increase will not be felt so seriously as heretofore.

Appropriations

Upon the completion of this work the Patent Office will be relieved of one large item of expense, while, as I have shown, the amount required for the payment of salaries may probably be diminished. This will result in a much larger surplus of receipts over expenditures. There is yet much to be done before the mass of information stored away in the Patent Office will become easily accessible to the public.

From 1836 to the present time over 158,000 patents have been issued. Since 1836 the specifications have been printed, and copies can be obtained at a very small expense. But no information can be gained by the public of patents granted prior to 1866, except from the old and very meager reports, from manuscript copies of the records, and from photolithographs of the drawings of some classes only. When the photolithographing of the drawings of all back issues has been completed, I believe that a portion of the surplus receipts of the Office should be devoted from year to year to the printing of the specifications of all patents granted prior to 1866. We shall then have all the American patents, like the English, in symmetrical, easily examined printed form, with an ample supply, so that libraries in different parts of the country may be provided with the complete record of all patents granted, and full information in relation to old patents may be obtained as cheaply and readily as of the current issues.

As the records of this Government now stand, of part of the patents granted prior to 1866 only one copy of the drawings (excepting that in possession of the patentee) is in existence; of the specifications the Office has only one or two manuscript copies; and it is easier for our inventors to gain full information of English patents than of those of their own country, for the reason that some public libraries to the country are provided with complete printed records of English patents. In fact, this Office (by the liberality of the English government) has all these printed records of English patents, but not of its own. But the multiplication of copies in printed form concerns not only the public at large. The records of the Patent Office sustain a relation to the current work differing widely from that of any other bureau under the Government. In other Government offices the papers in cases once decided are filed away, with little probability of ever being consulted again; but in the Patent Office an application once made and decided upon may become, in turn, a reference for subsequent applications of its class. Hence the files of the Office must be inspected daily in the work of examining pending applications. I therefore respectfully urge that these records, which are truly the only complete history of the progress of invention in the country, the only reliable exponent of the state of the art, the sole and constant reference both of the Office and inventors, may be multiplied in printed form.

There is also urgent need of complete digests of all the patents in each one of the one hundred and forty five subdivisions, as inventions have been classified in the Office. These would render the work of examining more expeditious and certain. The English government has published such digests. These contain, in greatly abridged form, properly classified and arranged, all the patents issued by the government, and appear to have met with great favor. There is also a strong demand for the publication of an abridgement of specifications in this country. If the Commissioner should be authorized to publish the volumes as fast as completed, in form something like that of the English abridgements, they would doubtless meet with a ready sale, which would nearly if not quite cover all the expense of publication. So seriously is the want of this abridgement felt by inventors and manufacturers, that every year examiners in the Patent Office are importuned by persons outside to prepare complete abridgements of patents in their class for publication and sale as a private enterprise; and in some instances large sums have been offered for complete digests of some special classes.

There is no occasion for any reduction of the fees demanded of applicants. They are trifling compared with the expenses attending the grant of a patent in other countries, and there is no complaint that they are exorbitant. I firmly believe that they should be kept at their present rate, and that most of the surplus receipts should be expended in the direction indicated for the benefit of the Office and that large portion of the public vitally interested in patents. Such use of the funds of the Office would meet a continually increasing demand, and be received with popular approbation. I should be glad if a small approbation could be made this year for the commencement of digests, and most earnestly recommend a special appropriation for this purpose, even though it may not exceed five or ten thousand dollars.

General Index

For the purpose of providing for the public some readily accessible information in regard to patents already granted in this country, the Commissioner has caused to be prepared, within the last two years, a general index of all patents issued from 1790 to 1873, inclusive. This index will be published in two sets of three volumes each -- one being an index of subject matter, and the others the names of patentees. Of the first, one volume has been published, the second will be out soon, and the third will follow shortly. The first edition has been limited to a thousand copies; but the matter has been stereotyped, so that any future demand can be readily supplied. A small number of copies is required for Office use; the remaining volumes will be sold at $20 per set. The patentees' index is not yet completed. Many orders have been received already for these indexes, and it seems reasonable to expect that the receipts from their sale will ultimately reimburse the Treasury for the expense of their publication.

Official Gazette

The Patent Office Official Gazette, the publication of which was commenced in 1872, has grown in popularity from year to year. The increase in its circulation, however, has not been rapid, owing in great measure to the fact that there is no authority for advertising it. Persons coming to the Office for the transaction of business frequently express surprise on learning of the publication of this journal. If some provision could be made for giving more general information of the publication of the Gazette, it is believed there would be large increase in subscriptions. A change has been made in the mode of publication during the last year. Up to the commencement of the current fiscal year the illustrations were produced by photolithography, and each weekly edition numbered ten thousand. This large number was necessary because the edition was not stereotyped, and as the Gazette is now the only Patent Office report, there will be a steady demand in the future for full sets. More than half the edition was stored for sale, and the pressure for more room in the Office made it desirable that some change should be effected by which less space for storage would be required. Accordingly, in the advertisement for proposals in the year commencing June 1, 1874, bids were asked for plate illustrations for an edition of five thousand copies only, the plates to become the property of the Office. A proposal for doing this work by the "heliotype" process, submitted by J. R. Osgood & Co., of Boston, Mass, was accepted, and a contract entered into with them by my predecessor for illustrations and plates for an edition of five thousand copies. The plates occupy very little space, and are readily stored in the Office. The letter-press portion of the Gazette is stereotyped at the Government Printing Office, so that the plates of both letter-press and illustrations are preserved, and a new edition of any number of volumes of the Gazette can be produced, should a necessity therefor arise.

At the same time, a change was made in the arrangement of the matter. A brief of the invention, and the claim of each patent are placed on the same page with the illustrations, the whole page being then reproduced by the heliotype process. On account of these changes, the appearance of the illustrated portion was for a short time quite unsatisfactory, but for the last three months it has been constantly improving, and is now very acceptable.

The Gazette is regarded with favor, not only by inventors and manufacturers, but also by gentlemen engaged in patent suits, both lawyers and judges. Since its first appearance it has contained, from time to time, reports of such decisions of the courts in patent cases as the Commissioner has been able to obtain. Under this practice these decisions are published some time before their appearance in any official report; hence the Gazette has become valuable as a medium for the prompt publication of judicial decisions. I have perfected an arrangement by which, during the year 1875, all decisions of the United States courts in patent cases will be reported at once in the Gazette. This, it is hoped, will enhance its value and increase its circulation.

The subscriptions for the Gazette do not cover the expense of publication; but it will be remembered that, in authorizing the work, Congress also provided for a large gratuitous circulation, each Senator and Representative being entitled to one copy for himself and to eight for public libraries designated by him. If the regular subscription price were received for these free copies, the cost of publication would be nearly if not quite repaid.

Of the first volume of the Gazette an edition of only one thousand was published. This edition was exhausted long since, and there is a constantly increasing demand for the volume. I respectfully recommend that provision be made for the publication of a new edition of this volume, which covers the first half of the year 1872. An edition of five thousand copies will cost from ten thousand to twelve thousand dollars. If this is authorized, I suggest that the Commissioner be allowed to send an unbound copy, gratuitously, to each person and library that the received the second volume free of expense.

Revision of the Law

Although a new and revised patent law was enacted in 1870, very little material change was effected, and the law today is essentially that of 1836. In the meantime business relating to patents, both inside and outside of the Office, has increased enormously. In the Office the organization is substantially the same as thirty-five years ago, when the number of applications was only a few hundred a year. The annual applications have increased from four hundred and thirty-five to twenty-one thousand six hundred and two, and the corps of examiners from one to one hundred. These officials make the primary action on all applications received, and if the decision is favorable to the petitioner, it is final.

After an experience in the Patent Office of nearly eleven years in varying positions, I have no hesitation in saying that the present organization is not entirely adapted to the large amount of business now transacted. Among so many persons, acting to some extent independently, mistakes will inevitably occur, and they are as likely to be in favor of an applicant as against him. There should be some provision for revising the favorable as well as adverse decisions of examiners. Other changes are demanded in the law to make the practice of the Office more simple, certain, and satisfactory.

There is also great complaint of the burden of litigation under the present law, which has become a great hardship to patentees under the present practice. A final decision by the United States Supreme Court cannot be expected in any case much short of six or seven years from the commencement of the suit. The expense of money attending patent litigation is fully as extravagant as that of time. It must be remembered, too, that all this expenditure of time and money occurs in the determination of rights which have only a limited duration. If seven years of the life-time of a patent are consumed in litigation, the enjoyment of the exclusive privilege intended by the grant is in reality reduced to ten years. The establishment of some more summary and inexpensive method of determining patent suits seem almost imperative.

I have great hesitation, however, in recommending changes in the law, and have hitherto only presented to the Committee on Patents of the two houses of Congress some few special amendments to overcome difficulties which have occurred in the conduct of business in the Office. What is needed is a careful and thorough revision of the entire law by persons familiar with out patent system, the respective interests of inventors and manufacturers, and the rights of the general public. In order that this may be done for the benefit of all classes interested therein, an examination should be made of the relations between patents and our manufactures, the general effect of our system, and the practice and wants of the Patent Office. I, therefore, very respectfully and earnestly recommend the appointment of either a special committee or a commission to prepare a new and revised patent law, to be reported at the first session of the next Congress.

Officials of the Patent Office, Civil Service, etc.

The work of the Patent Office calls for the exercise of judgment and intelligence of a high order. A thorough knowledge of the applied sciences and useful arts, especially on the part of those employed in the examining corps, is absolutely necessary. It gives me pleasure to speak in commendatory terms of the persons thus employed.

The operation of the civil-service rules has been of great advantage to the Patent Office. The entire force has been improved, but the change in the examining corps is more marked than elsewhere. The examinations for appointment and promotion have been conducted with great fairness and with the single intention of obtaining accurate information of the qualifications and aptness of candidates for the special work of the Patent Office. No system will produce uniformly satisfactory results. The operation of competitive examinations in the Patent Office forms no exception to this rule. But, notwithstanding occasional complaints, the opinion is quite generally expressed among gentlemen who have been acquainted with the Patent Office for twenty or thirty years past that the examining corps is, on the whole, in better condition now than ever before.

It is to be regretted that the most efficient and competent men cannot be retained in the Office. When they become thoroughly familiar with their duties and efficient in the performance of them, their services will command a much more liberal compensation outside than in the Office. The result is that some of the best examiners are led to resign their positions for the purpose of entering more lucrative employment, where their experience in the Patent Office becomes available.

The ready transaction of business in the Office is considerably impeded by the crowded condition of the rooms. I am compelled to reiterate the request for more room, which has been made repeatedly within the last few years. Some relief must be found before long. The model galleries are already filled to repletion, and new models are received at the rate of fifteen to eighteen thousand annually. In the rooms for drawings it is almost impossible to keep the records inside the doors, while in many other rooms the employees are so crowded as to greatly interfere with good health, and the convenient transaction of business. It would be a great mistake to dispense with either drawings or models. The former are indispensable for record purposes and as the basis of all illustrations prepared by the Office, while models furnish the best and sometimes the only satisfactory evidence of what in invention really is. A description or drawing may be obscure and liable to misinterpretation -- a model never. Additional room is an absolute necessity for the proper preservation of most valuable records, the public exhibition of an increasing number of models, and a prompt and efficient transaction of the very large amount of business now done in the Patent Office.

Respectfully submitted.
J.M. Thacher
Commissioner of Patents