CURIOSITIES

 

************************ 1848 ***********************

 

French Sewing Machine

1848 Scientific American
1848 Scientific American
The London Gazette 1850
The London Gazette 1850

 

 

************************ 1853 ***********************

Manufacturing of  Gloves

Grenoble - France

Hereford Journal - 3 August 1853
Hereford Journal - 3 August 1853

 

 

************************ 1854 ***********************

Stamford Mercury - 3 February 1854
Stamford Mercury - 3 February 1854
Chester Chronicle - 22 July 1854
Chester Chronicle - 22 July 1854

 

 

************************ 1866 ***********************

 

 

William Thomas

1866 October, 19 - Advertisement
1866 October, 19 - Advertisement
1866 October, 26 - Advertisement
1866 October, 26 - Advertisement

 

 

THOMAS  BLETCHER

"IMPROVEMENTS IN SEWING MACHINES"

 

PATENTS

GB 936   (March 27, 1869)

US 105.631  (July 26. 1870)

 

 

************************ 1871 ***********************

 ELECTRO-MAGNETIC SEWING-MACHINE

Our engravings illustrate the invention of Stevens and Handy, of San Francisco, California, patented in 1871. It consists in a novel arrangement of the apparatus which forms the motor, and which, according to the inventors, enables greatly increased results to be obtained from the coils with the same pulley power. It will be seen that the armatures drive the needle-bar directly, without the intervention of levers or other mechanism; while the feed-movement is also very simply arranged, and is likewise driven directly from the armatures.

Fig. 1 - Electro-Magnetic Sewing Machine  (1871)
Fig. 1 - Electro-Magnetic Sewing Machine (1871)

 

Figure 1 is a side-view of the essential portions of the apparatus  and Figure 2 is a vertical transverse section of one pair of coils, and also shows the feed motion.

Fig. 2 - Electro-Magnetic Sewing Machine  (1871)
Fig. 2 - Electro-Magnetic Sewing Machine (1871)

The following description applies to the two figures. A is a case which rests upon the top of a cabinet and serves to conceal portions of the machinery ; it also serves as a table for the work : two pairs of coils, B and C, are placed so that their upper ends stand just within or at the bottom of the case A, to which they are secured ; these coils are placed at such a distance apart as to admit of the working of an oscillating beam D, which is supported on standards over their central line ; this beam is balanced so that the magnets or armatures of one pair of coils are connected to one end, and those of the other pair to the opposite end. The coils are constructed as shown in Figure 2, being formed of insulated wire, coiled to suitable size, leaving an opening through the centre sufficiently large to admit the magnets and their armatures. The coil is surrounded by an iron cylinder, which greatly increases the power of any given coil. Outside this cylinder another coil may be placed, and this, in turn, enclosed by another iron cylinder; this gives good results, but not so great, in proportion, as are obtained from a single coil and cylinder, which the inventors consider sufficient. The magnets b and c are made, as usual, of soft iron, and each pair of bars united by a plate d across the top ; or they may be formed in one piece, as a U magnet reversed. The magnets extend down into the coils about two thirds of the depth of the latter, and the armatures f arise from the bottom, about one third of the height of the coil, this construction also adding greatly to their power. The oscillating beam D has one end connected to each of the plates d, and from some convenient point on its length the needle-bar E arises and extends forward to the table of the sewing machine, over which the work passes. From the centre of the beam D an arm F depends, and as the beam oscillates from the alternate attraction of the magnets, at either end, this bar vibrates from side to side, striking alternately pins on a vibrating bar i, which is pivoted at the bottom, and which is also caused to move from side to side. This alternately forms and breaks contact with the two pole changers g and h, and causes the pairs of coils B and C to act alternately, thus moving the magnets b, c, the beam D, and the needle-bar E. The feed-motion is operated in the following manner : A bar or arm V, extends forward from the end of the beam D, and partakes of its oscillations. Two standards m, m support a shaft G, which lies parallel with and a short distance from the arm V. At one end of the shaft is an arm H, which projects over the arm V, and as this oscillates it moves the arm II up and down, thus partially rotating the shaft G back and forth at each oscillation. A small crank arm o is fixed to the opposite end of the shaft G and the upper end of this is so attached or connected to the feed-plate p as to move it forward and back, raising it at the proper time. If found more desirable, two or more pairs of coils could be connected with each end of the oscillating beam D, but the inventors have found one pair sufficient for all ordinary purposes. In order to prevent noise, and diminish the force with which the magnets and armatures would meet, the arms V pass through a case K, within which are placed elastic cushions, above and below, and against which the bar strikes as it moves. The inventors also patent a form of " switch," by means of which they are enabled to control the battery power, employing either two, four, or any number of cells required. Although the invention is here shown as applied to a sewing-machine, it is really capable of being employed in working various other machines.  

 

 

The Nottingham Sewing Machine

In December, 1844, a Nottingham inventor made a sewing machine without knowing it. Mr. Foster, the inventor, was a very young man, only nineteen, when he first contrived his machine, and in conjunction with his moneyed partner, Mr. Gibbons, brought it into practical use at the time mentioned. The patent, which was taken out, was for " working ornamental designs on lace or net, and other fabrics, by machinery, in such manner that two threads are caused to loop together, one thread passing through the fabric, and the other looping therewith on the surface without passing through the fabric." It is not necessary to describe the machinery by which this was done. Suffice it to say there were two needles, one on each side of the fabric, the one curved and the other straight; there was also a needle and shuttle arrangement. After giving a description of this machinery, the specification of the patent goes on to, describe other machinery for "sewing thread, yarn, gimp, cord, or fabrics in pattern, on the- surface of fabrics". " If desired," it adds, " a second fabric may be placed on the fabric to be ornamented, and when sewed together, the former may be cut away between the figures or patterns." If this was not a true sewing machine what is ? After Howe's invention became known in England, Foster altered his machine, and made a sewing machine of it, while even as it was it was sufficient to invalidate Howe's (or Thomas's) patent, parts of which were accordingly disclaimed.

By H. T. Wood.                                             The Sewing Machine Gazette 1884

 

Foster actually was Fisher, 

GB 10.424    John Fisher James Gibbons   December 7, 1844 

 

 

************************ 1876 ***********************

 

HAND SEWING MACHINE

1876
1876

 

 

************************ 1879 ***********************

 AMERICAN PATENT OFFICE REPORT

The Sewing Machine Gazette 1881
The Sewing Machine Gazette 1881

 

 

************************ 1881 ***********************

 A NEW FUR SEWING MACHINE

The Sewing Machine Gazette 1881
The Sewing Machine Gazette 1881

 

 

C...HIMONNIER

INVENTOR OF THE SEWING MACHINE

The Sewing Machine Gazette 1881
The Sewing Machine Gazette 1881

 

 

************************ 1893 ***********************

The Sewing Machine Gazette 1893
The Sewing Machine Gazette 1893
1893 Scientific American Bolgiano's Motor
1893 Scientific American Bolgiano's Motor

 

 

************************ 1904 ***********************

1904 THE JOURNAL
1904 THE JOURNAL

 

 

************************ 1921 ***********************

 MANUFACTURE OF SEWING MACHINE

American Machinist  1921
American Machinist 1921

 

 

As reproduction of  Historical artifacts, this works may contain errors of spelling and/or missing words and/or missing pages, poor pictures, etc.