US PATENTS IN 1855

DESCRIPTIONS AND CLAIMS OF SEVERAL AMERICAN PATENTS ISSUED IN THE YEAR 1855

 

This list of patents is far than be complete, further researches will be done, including patents for Needles and Knitting Machines.

Number of applications for patents during the year ...................... 4.435

Patents issued during the year ...................................................... 2.024

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JANUARY 1855

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US 12.146                             Daniel  T.  Ward

Sewing Machine

The inventor says: I do not claim any particular method of moving the needle; neither do I limit myself to using my improvement with the arrangement of needles and levers to the same, herein shown; but what I desire to secure by letters-patent is:

I claim the sliding fork 8, with or without the bristles 9, to detach the thread from the sides of the needle, or form a guide to the loop for the passage of the looper or shuttle, in the manner and as described and shown.  

January 2, 1855

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US 12.233                          Jotham  S.  Conant

Sewing Machine

The improvement consists in the use of an endless circular feeder D, revolving continuously, so as to supply the cloth to the needle a (on vibrating arm L), without the necessity, at any time, of stopping the machine for the purpose of attaching the cloth to the feed-bar, as has heretofore been the case. The pins c are to insure the motion of the cloth with the feeder.

Claim. An endless rotary cloth-feeder, in combination with a reciprocating needle or needles, substantially as described.

Assignor to A. B. Ely

January 16, 1855

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US 12.247                            Hezekiah B. Smith

Sewing Machine

The inventor says : I do not claim a two-pointed needle having an eye in its centre, as this has been patented to J. J. Greenough; neither do I claim any other part, device, or thing claimed or patented in said Greenougli's patent.

But I claim, 1st. A slit or fissure formed in a needle, so as to be opened by any proper pointed instrument and the thread inserted in this fissure and then moved near to one end of it; then by removing the pointed instrument the two elastic or spring sides of this fissure close together and pinch and hold the thread so that the needle can be operated to sew a straight or curved seam and a through or back stitch, essentially in the manner and for the purpose set forth.

2d. I claim the finger Y, so arranged and operated (on the arm s by means of the spiral spring, the ring to adjust this spring and the slop T, or otherwise) as to draw the thread through the cloth so as to draw up the stitch and then let go of the thread, by the revolving or moving of this finger and the aim s, or equivalent, essentially in the manner and for the purpose set forth.

January 16, 1855

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US 12.322                              John B. Nichols

Sewing Machine

Claim. The combination of a binding guide with a sewing machine, meaning to claim the combination of mechanism whereby the operations of directing or applying the binding to the edge of any material and sewing it thereon, are conducted by automatic process.

January 30, 1855

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US 12.336                               Salem Wilder

Waxing Thread for Sewing Machine

Claim. So applying the wax-holder to the frame or arm of the machine and between the needle and the eye of the needle-carrier, that the vertical movements of the carrier shall cause the thread to be moved or drawn up and down through the wax-holder and its elastic bottom, whereby the saturating of the thread becomes improved, as specified. Also, the combination of an elastic bottom, or partition and its compressor, with the wax-holder, the same being to regulate the application of the wax to the thread and to prevent its escape from the waxholder, essentially as described.

January 30, 1855

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FEBRUARY 1855

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US 12.364                              Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

Claim. Imparting the feed-motion to the needle to move the cloth or other substance, to determine the space of the stitches to be made therein, by a feed-hand, or its equivalent, receiving the required motion from the mechanism and acting against the needle, in close proximity to or in contact with the cloth, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

February 6, 1855

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US 12.389          George  H. Horn  &  Benjamin  H.  Horn

Sewing Machine

The inventors say: We are aware that sewing has been effected by two threads; the one being carried by a shuttle, the other by the needle, therefore we do not claim the same and we are aware that the stitch has been pulled tight by the motion of the needle and needle-carrier. And we do not claim the shuttle. But we are not aware that forceps have ever been used to pass through the loop of thread and open the same, thereby insuring the opening of the loop and preventing tangling; nor do we know that the shuttle has been drawn through a loop by means of an eye on the end, thereby avoiding all liability of the shuttle not passing into the loop and where the shuttle is forced through the loop as the needle draws up, its thread has to pass between the rear end of the shuttle and the part has forced the shuttle forward, which is liable to break the thread.

We claim, 1st. A hollow needle with an eye in the side to pass the thread, as specified. 2d. We claim opening the loop by means of forceps, thereby insuring that the loop is properly opened and avoiding tangling of the thread, as specified. 3d. We claim drawing the shuttle through the loop by means of the eye O, or its equivalent, on the end of said shuttle, as specified, thereby avoiding the risk of breaking the loop when the shuttle is forced through the same, as specified.

February 13, 1855

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US 12.402                          Edwin  A.  Forbush

Sewing Machine

The inventor says: I would remark that I do not lay claim to any method of drawing the thread through the work by seizing the needle by a pair of pincers and performing the whole operation of drawing the thread close into the work by draught on the said needle; nor do I claim a mode of drawing the thread into the work by means of a tripping roller moved by an endless chain. But I claim combining with the carriage T the clamps a b and bearer V, or mechanism which draws the needle through the work, a set of pincers S S made to firmly grasp the thread between the needle and the work and to be so moved away from the work as to draw the thread firmly into it, as specified. And in combination with the said machinery for holding the needle and drawing it through the cloth or work, I claim machinery or mechanism, viz: the rotary shaft c, the clamps a b  and the bearer V, operated as described, or their equivalents, tor rotating the needle, or turning or rotating it around 180 degrees, or end for end, as above specified, such mechanism allowing me to make use of a common or ordinary needle made with one eye and but one point, as described. I also claim the combining with the nippers S S and the vibrating arm K, the carriages L and T, the spring-bolt and contrivances for operating it, as set forth; the same being not only to draw the thread  into the work with sufficient tension, but to do so under any change in the length of it, essentially as specified. I also claim the combination of the rotaling-bearer V, the two needle-clamps a b and the vertical rotary-shaft c, as operating together, or operated substantially as described and for the purpose of holding, releasing and reversing the needle or turning it around, substantially as above set forth. I also claim to combine with the rotary-bearer V and its clamps and shaft c, or machinery for holding, releasing and directing a needle into the work, a propeller a(5), operated or made to operate substantially in the manner and so as to force the needle into the work, as specified. I also claim to combine with the spring-nippers b(2) c(2), or machinery for taking up the slack of the thread, and preventing entanglement of the thread, while the carriages are being moved towards the work , the sliding carriage S2, or mechanism operating as described, for preventing the weight of the said spring-nippers b(2) c(2) and their slide d(2) from being thrown upon the thread so as to break the needle or displace it while it is being turned round, as set forth.  

February  20, 1855

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MARCH 1855

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US 12.573                           George W.  Stedman

Sewing Machine

The inventor says: I claim feeding the cloth along by means of the needle acting as a lever against it over a fulcrum t, the needle-carrier being driven for the purpose with a crank motion or its equivalent, substantially as set forth. In connection with the above motion of the needle, I also claim regulating the length of stitch by the combined action of the slot i, of adjustable length and the slight spring j or its equivalent, for throwing the needle away from the fulcrum when disengaged from the cloth, substantially as described. I also claim the construction of the finger M, with a thin-pointed beak m for entering the loop, with a wedge-shaped shoulder n for spreading the loop open to receive the needle in turn and with a spring p for retarding the motion of the loop, arranged and operating in combination with the needle, substantially in the manner and for the purposes set forth.  

March 20, 1855

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US 12.577                        Thomas J. W. Robertson

Sewing Machine

The inventor says in his specification: I describe the feeding operation first, supposing the dog to be raised from the surface of the cloth and hanging against the sciew g, as indicated in dotted lines in figure 1. I will now suppose the needle-slider and the wiper to be rising from the cloth, by which action the wiper j will push aside the arm h of the three-armed lever to the position in which it is shown in full lines and in so doing will depress the arm c. The feed-bar F during the above operation will slide along the point of the screw g until the dog f bears upon the cloth, after which the dog will be caused to slide the cloth along the table in the direction of the arrow. When the needle-slider and wiper j descend, the wiper in pushing aside the arm i will raise the arm c and as the dog is by that means withdrawn from contact with the cloth, the feed- bar will fall back to the screw g. I do not claim in itself as new the arrangement of the feeding-dog and spring-clamp, separately operating upon the cloth on its one or outside surface, as such has before been done by the alternate action of these devices. Neither do I claim of itself a separate and constant spring pressure applied to the outside surface of the cloth when the feeding- bar or dog is otherwise arranged to operate in connexion with the spring-clamp or hold, as specified. But I claim the combination of the spring-clamp D with the feedingbar or dog f, constructed, arranged and operating together against the cloth on its one side or surface, substantially as set forth.

March 20, 1855

Reissued         January 15, 1856     US RE 343

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APRIL 1855

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US 12.754                              E. Harry  Smith

Sewing Machine

The inventor says: I am aware that machines have been before constructed in which a rotary shuttle has been used and also that a machine has been made which is the subject of a patent granted to Allen B. Wilson and dated June 15, 1852 (US  9.041), in which a combination is used of a bobbin with a rotating hook, which operates upon the loop in such a manner as to throw it over the bobbin. But I would have it understood that I make no claim to any such rotating hook, or any rotary shuttle, except that represented and described in the accompanying drawing and specification. I therefore claim a discoidal shuttle, having its bearings in its periphery and revolving around its own axis, when constructed substantially in the manner and of the form described. And as a means of propelling the shuttle, I claim the employment of the lune-form button, constructed as described, which has a movement on ils axis in the manner set forth, for the purpose of allowing the thread to slip alternately into and out of the concave in its periphery and thus pass off the shuttle.

Assignor to Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Company

April 17, 1855

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MAY 1855

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US 12.798                          George W.  Stedman

Sewing Machine

Claim. Feeding the cloth or other material along by means of a pin a, or its equivalent, playing in a revolving shaft B, which, at the proper moment in each revolution, brings it in contact with a stationary cam M or its equivalent, whereby the pin is pressed into the cloth, but again recedes therefrom as soon as freed from the cam, substantially as herein set forth. Also the cam M, constructed substantially as described, when arranged upon a movable arm or its equivalent; so that, by simply adjusting its position, the length of stitch can be varied at the will of the operator.

May 1, 1855

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US 12.826                              Henry B. Odiorne

Guides for Hemming and Cording

The retainer G is intended to keep the cord H securely in its place within the hem before it is stitched and to keep the said hem down afterwards. The spring-guide F acts as a gauge for the width of the hem, while its elasticity allows inequalities in the fabric to pass. The inventor says: I do not claim an adjustable spring-guide for a sewing machine, nor do I claim the combination of a guide for the cord with a hemming-guide, as in the patent of S. C. Blodget, upon which invention I conceive I have made a marked improvement. But I do claim the curved retainer G, with its notched end h, in combination with the shoe d, for effectually keeping the cord in contact with the inside of the hem of the fabric, while the said hem is being operated upon by the needle and thread of a sewing machine.

May 8, 1855

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US 12.856              John Chilcott & James Scrimgeour

Sewing Machine

The inventors say: We are aware that sewing-machines have been constructed so that their feed-mechanism might be varied to run the seam either longitudinally with or circularly round a cylindrical mandrel by substituting one set of feeding-rollers for another and that these rollers have been arranged on one side of the material being sewn, to operate in connection with bearing- rollers on the other side, to prevent drag and that such bearing-rollers have been made adjustable round the needle, to run in either one of the two directions of seam specified; such, therefore, we do not claim, neither do we use or claim a rotating table, with guide, on its face, to adjust the direction of the seam, as known to be old. But we do claim the arrangement herein shown and described of the revolving disk D, within or on the fixed table and having its axis in line with the needle, as specified, when combined to operate together with a roller E, bearing on the opposite side of the cloth and made adjustable to any position in a circle round the centre of the said disk, to vary with facility and despatch the run of the seam in lines, on any side of the needle, without the aid of guides on the face of the table and whether the revolving disk or bearing-roller be caused to move the cloth, as herein set forth.

May 15, 1855

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US 12.858                          Henry W. Dickinson

Cording-Guide for Sewing Machine

The operation of this improvement is apparent from the figure. Claim:

1st. A holder or presser A to a sewing-machine, formed with a groove b, to hold a cord in its place while being stitched into cloth or other material, for the purpose of forming a corded seam, in the manner described.

2d. Forming the face or bearing side of an adjustable guide B with grooves g so arranged as to receive and act upon a finished corded seam and guide the cloth parallel while stitching another seam or sewing in another cord, as described.

May 15, 1855

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US 12.896                             Cushman  Robert

Knitting Machine Stop Motion  

May 22, 1855

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US 12.902                             Charles A. Durgin

Sewing Machine

Claim. The vibrating-hook for holding down the thread during the partial passage of the shuttle through the loop, when arranged and operating substantially in the manner described.

May 22, 1855

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US 12.923                           T. J. W.  Robertson

Sewing Machine

Claim. So arranging and applying the looper b, or its equivalent, by which the loop in the needle-thread is extended or directed for the purpose of completing the stitch, that it shall derive its movement from the needle substantially as herein described.

May 22, 1855

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US 12.939                             Joseph  Bond jr.

Sewing Machine

This invention consists in producing the so-called "Howe's lock stitch" by means of a spool-case caused to revolve horizontally, while the needle has a vertical movement. The inventor says: I do not lay any claim to the feeding-apparatus, or to the method of actuating the needles. But I do claim:

1st. The spool-case I, with teeth or their equivalents on its outer edge, and the nose L, for catching the needle-thread  in combination with the wheel H, having teeth cut away at p, substantially in the manner and for the purpose specified.

2d. The hollow spool-case I, with its spool M, in combination with the radiating arm N, or its equivalent, as shown and described.

3d. The auxiliary lever X, as operated by cams on the driving-shaft C, not for the purpose of controlling the needle-thread between the eye of the needle and the goods, as in Harris's and Howe's machine, nor for the purpose of tightening the stitch, as this is done by the needle-bar, but in conjunction with the spool-case I, so as to accommodate the needle-thread as it passes over the spool-case, thereby diminishing the extent of movement required in the needles of other machines.

May 22, 1855

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US 12.969                              Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

Claim. In sewing seams in cloth and other substances by machinery, suspending the feed-motion for the purpose of causing the needle to perform two successive operations in one and the same puncture, to tie the seam, substantially as specified. Also, connecting the pressure-pad with its slide, or the equivalent thereof, by means of a long jointed arm, substantially as described, in combination with the feed-wheel, or its equivalent, as described, so that the said pressure-pad shall move with the cloth or other substance, when fed forward for spacing the stitches, instead of making friction, which would tend to pucker or wrinkle such cloth, or other substance, as described and by which, also, the cloth is relieved from pressure after the needle has entered, so that it can be turned freely on the needle as an axis, as set forth.

May 29, 1855

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US 12.984                              Addison Capron

Sewing Machine

This machine serves for sewing hooks and eyes, or various articles, to a sheet of paper or other material.

Claim. Combining the needle with the main carrier by means of a secondary carrier and a spring, or the equivalent thereof, applied to the main carrier, so as to operate substantially in the manner and for the purpose before specified.

May 29, 1855

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JUNE 1855

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US 13.064                           T. J. W. Robertson

Sewing Machine

Claim. Making a needle-thread single or chain-stitch, by means of a detached and loosely held looper b and reciprocating needle, arranged and operating together in such a manner that while the needle in its back-stroke draws the slack of its thread on to or along and around the looper, the looper, without detaining the loop formed by the drawing of the slack of the needle thread on and along it, guides and keeps the loop open and the needle and its thread, in their next advance stroke, pass through the open loop, which, kept moving and having the further feed of its own or needle- thread passed through it, as specified, is drawn entirely over and off the looper b to complete the stitch, substantially as described.

June 12, 1855

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US 13.065                                Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

The inventor says: I am aware that the cloth in sewing machines has been held to the periphery of the feed-wheel by yielding pressure and therefore I wish it to be understood that I make no claim to this mode of operation.

I claim, feeding the cloth or other substance in sewing machines by means of a wheel hung on a vibrating lever, or equivalent therefor and borne upward by a spring or its equivalent, against the under surface of and in combination with a fixed pad, substantially as described.

June 12, 1855

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JULY 1855

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US 13.178                          Jean Pierre Molliere

Sewing Machine

Patented in France, May 30, 1855. A description and drawings, illustrating the various features of this improvement, would necessarily be too extensive to be given in this report.

July 3, 1855

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US 13.195                           Jerome B. Woodruff

Sewing Machine

The needle-arm (made in imitation of a bird) is hollow. P is the shuttle carrier.

The inventor says: I claim:

1st. The making of the needle-bar hollow and providing it with a door or slide, for the purpose of holding encased therein such parts of the machine as may be desired and this, I claim, whether the needle-bar be ornamented as described, or otherwise.

I also claim the direct and positive connection of the needle-arm and shuttle-carrier, by which means they both move simultaneously and in perfect harmony with each other, so that whichever way the pulley is driven, the operations of the machine will be the same, substantially as described.

July 3, 1855

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US 13.201                           George W. Stedman

Sewing Machine

Claim. Mounting a bobbin B, or its equivalent, upon and combining it with a reciprocating plate or looper A, which is provided with a pointed projection extending before said bobbin and arranged so as to enter the loop of the needle-thread, then carry the bobbin over the outside of and finally back through said loop, substantially as described; whereby the liability to miss the stitch and break the needle, together with the noise and friction of a shuttle, is avoided, the use of oil for lubricating the shuttle-race dispensed with and the consequent soiling of the thread prevented. Also constructing the bobbin with one face sunk below or flush with the edge of the other face, its thread consequently unwinding from its face instead of its periphery, for the purpose of preventing the loop of the needle-thread getting inside of the bobbin, substantially as set forth.

July 3, 1855

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US 13.242                          Jerome B. Woodruff

Sewing Machine

Claim. The arrangement of the needle-shuttle and feeding arms. The giving to the needle and the shuttle such relative range of vibration. The combination of the feeding-pawl with the feeding-lever to raise and lower the teeth of the pawl, and the inclined plane to vibrate them laterally,

July 10, 1855 

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US 13.275                         Frederick R. Robinson

Guides for Sewing Machine

Claim. The combination of the seam-gauge or guide with a sewing machine.

July 17, 1855

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US 13.353                          James  Harrison Jr.

Sewing Machine

The nature of this improvement will be understood from the claims and engravings. Fig. 2 represents the feed in two positions: one represented in full, the other in dotted lines. Claim:

1st. Feeding the material to be sewed by means of a feedplate B, which is guided substantially as herein described, in the direction of any curved, circuitous, or irregular line of sewing, by means of grooves d dl, or their equivalent, on its back-side, of a form corresponding to the said line, receiving or working in contact with fixed pins c c1, or their equivalent fixed guides, whereby motion is only allowed to the said feed-plate in such direction as to make the material describe, in passing the needle, the intended line, the said feed-plate receiving motion by any mechanical device suitable for the purpose.

2d. Combining the guide-pins c c1, or their equivalents, with the shoe c, which confines the feed-plate and produces the necessary pressure of the plate on the material A, substantially as specified.

July 31, 1855

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US 13.362                              Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

The feed-plate d (roughened at its upper surface) has a vibratory motion. During its forward motion, the cloth between it and the pressure-pad p will be carried forward; but during its backward motion the lifter r rises and holds the cloth above the upper surface of the feed-plate, so that it (the cloth) will not be carried back with the backward motion of the feed-plate.

Claim. The combination of the lifter, substantially as specified, with the vibrating feed-plate and pressure-pad, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

July 31, 1855

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AUGUST 1855

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US 13.499              Francis A. Ross & Wm. H. Marshall

Sewing Machine Cases

The nature of this invention will be understood from the claims and engravings.

We claim the making the case in the form of a cabinet, which when opened will afford space for operating the machine by the treadles and will form a table for the work, by raising the leaves and supporting them by the doors of the cabinet when thrown open, in the manner described. We also claim the construction of the folding top, which when open furnishes drawers and shelf for the convenience of the operator, as described.

August 28, 1855

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OCTOBER 1855

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US 13.616                           James  Harrison Jr.

Sewing Machine

Claim:

1st. In connexion with the giving of the two needles a a1 such a movement as will cause both at once, during any revolution or stroke of the machine, to be withdrawn from the cloth for a sufficient time to effect the feed movement, the employment of a supplementary needle b, arranged and operating substantially as described, to supply the place of the needle a, which operates first after the feed movement and to retain the loop in the thread which has been put through the cloth by the needle which last leaves the cloth before the feed movement, until the first-named needle operates to pass through the said loop, substantially as described.

2d. The attachment of the clamps I I1, which hold the material to be served to two swinging guide-plates G G1, or their equivalents, which serve also as guide-plates for the needle-bars and thereby cause the needles and the clamps to swing together, substantially as described; whereby the clamps are enabled to accommodate themselves to different or varying thicknesses of material and to be opened to slacken their hold upon the material during the feed movement and the needles are enabled to be kept in a proper or desirable relation to the clamp.

3d. The connexion of the two swinging guide-plates G G1, or their equivalents, in any manner substantially as described, whereby one of them is caused to have a movement so much greater than the other, that the relative movements of the needles and clamps shall be such that the needles, in all positions of the clamps, will cross each other in the plane of, or as near as is desired to the plane of the face of one of the clamps, which is the plane of one surface of the material, as fully set forth.

October 2, 1855

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US 13.629                         Humphrey  M.  Glines

Machine for Winding or Filling the Needles with Twine which are used in making Weavers' Harness, Nets, Seines, &c.

Assignor to John M. Stanton  &  S. F. Stanton

October 2, 1855

Reissue   US RE 378    July 15, 1856

Assignor, by Mesne Assignments, to P. Bennet, J. Kendrick & L. A. Cook

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US 13.630                          C. J.  Cowperthwaite

Sewing Machine

The inventor says : I do not claim the application of aweight simply to give pressure to the cloth-holder, either fixed or adjustable. But I claim:

1st. The weight trip-lever K applied, substantially as described, to the bar J or its equivalent, which holds the cloth, so as to serve not only to apply pressure to the cloth, but to hold up the said bar, or equivalent, from the cloth, when desired and also to allow the said bar or equivalent, when its foot is struck by the needle-bar, while it is held up, to descend and to hold it down again until it is lifted by the operator, substantially as described.

2d. I claim arranging the shuttle-race obliquely to the direction in which the cloth is moved, to produce the seam or line of sewing, substantially as described, for the purpose of causing the visible parts of the stitches on the front or upper side of the cloth to be straight, or all in the same line.

 

October 9, 1855

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US 13.661                              Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

Claim. In combination with the shuttle and attached thereto, the employment of a spring pressure guide, substantially as specified, to control the shuttle-thread as the needle enters the cloth, or other substance to be sewed, as set forth and for the purpose specified and the continuous feed motion for spacing the stitches, substantially as specified, in combination with the vibratory motion of the needle imparted in one direction by the feed motion and in the opposite by a spring or any equivalent therefor, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

 

October 9, 1855

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US 13.662                             Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

Claim:

1st. The employment of a supporting tongue, substantially as described, placed between and in combination with the two needles, to support the cloth, or other substance, and prevent its being puckered during the operation of sewing and drawing the two rows of stitches tight, substantially as described.

2d. The employment of the guide-plates, substantially as described, to guide cloth that has been folded in making flat, lapped, or other analogous seams, as described, so that the row or rows of stitches shall be made at a regular and determined distance from the folded edge, as set forth.

3d. In combination with one or more eye-pointed needles and shuttles, or the equivalent therefor, for sewing one or more seams, the employment of a vibrating thread-carrier, for carrying a thread or threads alternately in opposite directions across the seam or seams and laying it on the face of the cloth, substantially as described, so that it shall be secured to the face of the cloth by the needle-thread or threads, as described.

October 9, 1855

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US 13.687                              Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

Claim. The method, substantially as described, of protecting the needle from all injury by the interposition of a movable shield between the needle and shuttle, which is removed after the needle has descended, to permit the shuttle to pass between the needle and the thread, as set forth.

October 16, 1855

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US 13.727                               L. W. Langdon

Sewing Machine

The inventor says:

1st. I claim making a stitch by tying a half knot or a whole knot, at the will of the operator, in the manner set forth and described.

2d. I claim the snail-worm on the revolving vertical face-plate for the purpose of holding the thread until the knot is tied and the casting it off in time for the stitch to be drawn up.

3d. I further claim the vertical face-plate into which the shuttle is set for the purpose of carrying it around and the reaction of the looper K for quickening the motion of the shuttle as it passes the needle, for the purpose of letting the looper pass out freely.

4th. I do not claim, broadly, feeding the cloth by the motion of the needle; but I do claim feeding the material by the needle when combined and arranged with the lateral motion of the needle in the manner described, that is to say, in connection with the rock-shaft H, with the sliding-step in the end, the connecting-rod q, the spring S, the set-screw and rollers R R, the cams T T, the sliding-bar P and the adjustable lever o, as set forth.

October 30, 1855

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NOVEMBER 1855

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US 13.768                              Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

Claim. The employment of two eye-pointed needles, carrying its appropriate thread and the two working in unison, substantially as specified, in combination with a shuttle, or equivalent therefor, to effect the concatenation of the two sets of stitches, substantially as specified and for the purposes set forth.

November 6, 1855

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US 13.856                          George W. Stedman

Sewing Machine

Claim. Feeding the cloth or other material along by means of the thread, which is suitably acted upon for the purpose of tightening each stitch.

 

November 27, 1855

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DECEMBER 1855

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US 13.966                              Isaac M. Singer

Sewing Machine

Claim. The mode of operation, substantially as described, for forming seams, by alternately making a loop forward and then a short back-stitch by means of an eye-pointed needle, which merely carries a part of its thread through the cloth or other substance, that it may be interlaced or concatenated, as set forth, whether the said mode of operation be applied by the means specified or any equivalent therefor, as set forth.

December 18, 1855

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The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)

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Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the Year 1855