WILLIAM  C.  WATSON 

Sewing Machines

 

The earliest Watson machines were two threads lockstitch machines, as described in the Scientific American, August 10, 1850.

Scientific American, August 10, 1850
Scientific American, August 10, 1850

 

Although the magazine reported that the inventor had applied for a patent, the earliest lockstitch patent issued to William C. Watson was on March 11, 1856.

A few of his machines were made in 1850, the article continued, “several of these machines are nearly finished ... persons desirous of seeing them can be gratified by calling upon Messrs. Jones & Lee.”

A William C. Watson machine was exhibited by Jones & Lee at the                     Sixth Exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics Association  held in Boston in September 1850.

A Watson machine was exhibited at the                                                           1853 New York Industry of All Nations Exhibition.                                   This was a single-looping machine; Watson received a patent for this                 single-thread machine on November 25, 1856.

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US 16.136  William  C.  Watson    November 25, 1856

US Patent   16.136    WILLIAM  C.  WATSON     November  25  1856
US Patent 16.136 WILLIAM C. WATSON November 25 1856

 

 

$ 10

 from the Scientific American,                        December 13, 1856
from the Scientific American, December 13, 1856

In the December 13, 1856, issue of Scientific American, a machine called Watson’s “Family” sewing machine was illustrated and described. It was a small machine (only 8 by 5 inches) manufactured by Watson & Wooster and selling for $10. References to the Watson single-thread machine occur as late as 1860, but no examples are known to have survived. 

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Maggie's Old Sewing Machines
Maggie's Old Sewing Machines
Maggie's Old Sewing Machines
Maggie's Old Sewing Machines

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US 14.433  William  C.  Watson    March 11, 1856

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US 18.834                           William  C.  Watson            December 8, 1857

This invention consists in the employment, in a sewing machine, of a stationary needle combined in such a manner with a reciprocating table or cloth-holder that the protrusion of the needle through the cloth or material being sewed is caused by the movement of the said material, by which means several advantages are obtained over the use of a reciprocating needle and stationary table or cloth-holder. 

Assignor to himself and Geo H. Wooster

 

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sources:

The Invention of the Sewing Machine . Author: Grace Rogers Cooper

Maggie's Old Sewing Machines        Author:  Maggie Snell