DATING & IDENTIFYING

WHITE SEWING MACHINES

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Raymond              1857

A.F.  Johnson      US  20.686    June 22  1858

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1858-1861   Brattleboro, Vermont

Samuel Barker         Stephen French

 

1862-1863   Orange, Massachusetts

William L. Grout         Stephen French

 

1863-1866   Orange, Massachusetts

 Stephen French            George Wells  Baker

 

1866-1876  White Mfg. Co.   Cleveland, Ohio

George Wells  Baker

 

From 1876 White Sewing Machine Company

George Wells  Baker  &  D'Arcy Porter

 

1857

?

By 1857 Thomas H. White had invented a small hand-operated sewing machine (on which he obtained a US patent in 1859), starting his own business, with partner William L. Grout and $350 initial capital, making "The New England Sewing Machine", retailing for $10. Seeking a central location near markets and materials. 

The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography (1931/vol.21)

US 24.629 (July 5, 1859)
US 24.629 (July 5, 1859)

William Grout of the city and county of Worcester, State of Massachusetts

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This small sewing machine, which has no identifying marks, may have been made in Brattleboro, Vermont by one of the two manufacturers operating there in the period from 1858-1865.

Thomas H. White and Samuel Barker made a machine known as the "Brattleboro" from around 1858 to 1861 and Nettleton & Raymond made the "Common Sense" brand machine in around 1857.


 

Collectively, all of these machines are known as "New England" style machines. It is possible, too, that it may have been made by one of several Massachusetts-based sewing machine companies.

In 1862, Thomas White left Vermont (Brattleboro) for Orange, Massachusetts, where he joined with William L. Grout for a year as Grout & White, but Grout broke with him and moved to Winchendon (Massachusetts), where he made machines for another year. Three other Orange, Massachusetts, based companies made these New England-style machines:

(Andrew J.) Clark & Barker (William?)(1862-65), Orange, Massachusetts.

Clark (Andrew J.?) (1865-67) Orange, Massachusetts.

Albert F. Johnson (1867) Orange, Massachusetts.

Finally, there were two Winchendon, Massachusetts-based companies making New England machines:

William L. Grout (1863) and J. G. Folsom (1865).

There is no record that these sewing machines were produced after 1867.

www.americancenturies.mass.edu

 

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US  20.686      Albert F.  JOHNSON       June 22  1858

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Barker stopped selling for White and formed another sewing-machine company together with A. J. Clark, called their machine "The Pride of the West" and later the "New England Machine".

In 1860, William Barker and Andrew J. Clark began producing The Pride of the West  and later the New England single thread hand sewing machine in Orange, Massachusetts. Over the next 20 years, the New England machine and the "Home Shuttle" were their two most significant products.

In 1882, the company reformed under the name New Home (a combination of the labels New England and Home Shuttle) and it continued to operate under that name for the better part of a century.

 

www.janome.com

ismacs.net

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Barker, who was White's main seller, decided to leave him and founded his own company, the Gold Medal Sewing Machine to produce a machine named "The Pride of the West" and later "the New England Machine". In 1867, Barker went back when he had started and settled his company in Orange just as his former employer Thomas White had done.

buisson.pagesperso-orange

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1858-1861

Brattleboro  

ca. 1858-1861 Brattleboro, Vermont

Thomas Howard White and Samuel Barker 

In 1858 in Brattleboro, Vermont, Tomas H. White and Samuel Barker, were manufacturing a small single thread family machine called the  Brattleboro.

In 1858 Thomas H. Whitewith a capital of $350 and with William L. Grout, who acted as salesman, as a partner, began manufacturing sewing machines in in a factory at Templeton"The New England" was the name of this machine, the retail price of which was ten dollars and although the partnership with Grout lasted only a year, the business prospered.

In 1861, Stephen French accepted a position with Thomas H. White,  making a single thread "hand" sewing machine.

Brattleboro is a town in Windham County, Vermont.

Templeton is a town in Worcester County, Massachusetts.

www.gutenberg.org

 

sites.google.com

 

buisson.pagesperso-orange

The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography (1931/vol.21)

 

1862-1863

New England

1862-1863 Orange, Massachusetts

Thomas Howard White and William L. Grout 

The manufacture of a revolving-Looper double-thread sewing machine, patented by Edwin Clark (US 26.336  December 6, 1859) and manufactured over three thousand by  Lamson, Goodnow, & Yale of Windsor, Vermont, widely advertised and sold for $35 with a foot-power table, was discontinued early in the summer of 1861. The sewing-machine equipment and business was sold to William L. Grout & Thomas Howard White.


 

In 1862, Thomas White left Vermont and went to Massachusetts. There, in partnership with William L.  Grout, he also began to manufacture New England machines; these were basically the same as the Raymond machines. 

www.gutenberg.org

In 1862, Thomas H. White and Stephen French, who has been his mechanics since 1861, left their Templeton manufacture to settle in Orange, Massachusetts and Mr. Stephen French was given a share of the company.

sites.google.com

New England

1863  Winchendon, Massachusetts

William Grout

In 1863 William L. Grout left the partnership with Thomas H. White and moved to Winchendon, Massachusetts, there continuing to make New England machines for approximately one more year. 

www.gutenberg.org

 

  

1864-65

?

 

 

1866-76

In 1866, just after the Civil War, Thomas H. White moved to Cleveland, Ohio from Orange, Massachusetts with his son and three employees (his best mechanics) and there founded the White Manufacturing Company. It was there that the first prototype of a White machine was built.

In 1866 Stephen French, who has been Thomas H. White mechanics since 1861, refused to go and with John Wilson Wheeler and Andrew J. Clark who had all previously worked with Thomas White went on building sewing machines.

In 1866 Stephen French became the superintendent of the Gold Medal Sewing Machine Company and remained in Orange.

From 1866 to 1876,  White Manufacturing Company new factory built sewing machine heads for W. G. Wilson, until that company purchased the existing patterns, templets, special equipment and established an independent plant in Chicago.

A new model had been perfected in the meantime by George Wells Baker and D'Arcy Porter of the White organization and its manufacture was commenced at once, the company was reorganized under the name of the White  Sewing Machine Company.


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WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY 

1876-1879

# 28.241
# 28.241

This machine bears the serial number # 28.241 and the following US patents:

 

US 174.703         D'Arcy Porter & George W. Baker          March 14, 1876

                                                                                                  May 2, 1876

US 183.528                          George  W.  Baker               October 24, 1876

                                                                                          January 16, 1877

US 188.537                             D'Arcy  Porter                      March 20, 1877

US  188.767                         George  W.  Baker                  March 27, 1877

 

Machines bears the above US Patents are manufactured between:

March 1877 c. and November 1881 c.

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The White machines of the 1870s may be dated approximately as follows:

 


1 ..........................................................

1876

9.000 ...................................................

1877

27.000 .................................................

1878

45.000 .................................................

1879

63.000 .................................................

 


www.gutenberg.org 

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US 194.067              George W.  Baker &  D'Arcy Porter  August 14, 1877

Improvement in locking Devices for Drive Wheel for Sewing Machines 

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Early White Model A with top tension, manual bobbin winder and boat shuttle. (Ray Elkins)
Early White Model A with top tension, manual bobbin winder and boat shuttle. (Ray Elkins)

 

 

1881

By 1881, the White factory was producing 8.000 sewing machines a month and nearly 900 men were engaged in the various stages of their manufacture.

Automobile quarterly by Princeton Institute for Historic Research.

100.000 machines per annum in 1881

The Sewing Machine Gazette 1881.

 

1881 RETAIL PRICE LIST
1881 RETAIL PRICE LIST


 

 

GB Patent 5.166  November 26, 1881

 H. J. Haddan. A communication from D'Arcy Porter and T. H. White, both of Cleveland, United States, for improvements in sewing machines.

Consists in a mechanical movement which converts the rotary motion of the main horizontal driving shaft into a vibration motion for operating the shuttle bar and by the interposition of other mechanism at the same time communicates rotary motion to the feed shaft.  

 

 

1882

The business grew from an original production of twenty-five machines a month to no fewer than 2.000 a week in 1882.  

The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography (1931 vol. 21)

 

 

1883

 

 

US PATENTS

 

US 124.360 (?)  March 5, 1872

No US Patent for WSMC or Assignor to WSMC

James A.  House (W&W)

 

US 174.703   March 14, 1876  

D'Arcy Porter & George W. Baker

 

May 2, 1876

October 24, 1876

January 16, 1877

 

US 188.537   March 20, 1877

D'Arcy Porter

 

US 188.767   March 27, 1877

George W.  Baker

  

November 26, 1881

 

US 310.081  December 30, 1884

D'Arcy  Porter  

 

 

December 4, 1888

 

 

May 21, 1889

  

 

March 11, 1890

  

 

March 11, 1890

  

 

March 11, 1890


around 1893
around 1893
from  March. 1890 c.  onwards
from March. 1890 c. onwards

 

 

1884

500.000 WHITE SEWING MACHINES NOW IN USE - 1884
500.000 WHITE SEWING MACHINES NOW IN USE - 1884

 

 

1887

WHITE GEM - 1887 c.
WHITE GEM - 1887 c.

 

 

1889

# 649.035  - Author: Luke Meier (between 1886 and 1889)
# 649.035 - Author: Luke Meier (between 1886 and 1889)

 

 

1893

GB 19.629                                  G.  Sawyer                   October i8th, 1893

A communication from the White Sewing Machine Company, of Cleveland, Ohio.

Relates to improved means or appliances for regulating and determining the tension of the thread from the head of a sewing machine, the tension being removable by the pressure foot left lever, in order that the thread may be readily drawn from the reel when a piece of work is completed, the tension not being otherwise affected, such as when the presser rises while seams or extra thickness of fabric are passing under it.  

 

Sewing Machines present at the 1893 London Exhibition

 

 

serial number on needle-plate # 149.110 (?)
serial number on needle-plate # 149.110 (?)

Plates on the above sewing machine may have been exchanged.

The patent dates on the bobbin winder are:

March 5, 1872

US 174.703                  March 14, 1876

May 2, 1876

January 16, 1877

March 20, 1877

US 188.767                March 27, 1877

 

The patent dates on the bobbin winder are:

May 14, 1872

US 174.703            March 14, 1876

July 11, 1882

# 927.984 - about 1893 (?)
# 927.984 - about 1893 (?)

 

 

1902

July 1902
July 1902

 

 

1914 ?

# FR 2.356.533
# FR 2.356.533
# FR  2.485.551
# FR 2.485.551
# FR 2.938.569
# FR 2.938.569
#  FR 3.000.712
# FR 3.000.712
# FR 3.361.764
# FR 3.361.764

 

 

?

WSMC  # 927.984
WSMC # 927.984

WSMC FR 249.711 - FAMILY ROTARY
WSMC FR 249.711 - FAMILY ROTARY

WSMC FR 2.938.569 - WHITE ROTARY
WSMC FR 2.938.569 - WHITE ROTARY

 

 

WHITE

Rotary

With the Great Depression came renewed interest in home sewing. White continued to innovate, introducing the first sewing machine outside of its traditional black models, which was made of a magnesium alloy and was also much lighter than its forebears.

 

 

WHITE

Rotary No 15 

 

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QUICK  DATING

1 .........................................................

1876

9.000 ..................................................

   + 18.000                                     1877

27.000 ................................................

   + 18.000                                     1878

45.000 ................................................

   + 18.000                                     1879

63.000 ................................................

   + 27.000   (?)                              1880

90.000 ................................................

   + 96.000                                      1881            (8.000 per month)

186.000 ...............................................

   +100.000                                     1882             (2.000 per week)

286.000 ...............................................

   + 84.000   (?)                               1883           Improved VS White

370.000 ...............................................

   + 60.000                                      1884     500.000  Sewing Machines in use

430.000 ...............................................

1885

490.000 ...............................................

1886

550.000 ...............................................

1887

610.000 ...............................................

1888

670.000 ...............................................

1889

730.000 ...............................................

1890

790.000 ...............................................

1891

850.000 ...............................................

1892

910.000 ...............................................

                 (1.000 per week) ?!         1893              (1.000 per day) 1893

970.000 ...............................................

1894

1.030.000 ............................................

1895

1.090.000 ............................................

1896

1.150.000 ............................................

1897

1.210.000 ............................................

1898

1.270.000 ............................................

1899

1.330.000 ............................................

1900

1.400.000 ............................................

1901

1.470.000 ............................................

1.500.00 July                                  1902             (Advertisement)

1.550.000 ............................................

1.389.763 (?)

1903

1.407.808 (?)

                  ............................................

1904

                  ............................................

1905

                  ............................................

1906

                  ............................................

1907

                  ............................................

1908

                  ............................................

1909

                  ............................................

1910

                  ............................................

1911

                  ............................................

1912

                  ............................................

2.276.398 Sept.                              1913

2.300.000 ............................................

1914

                  ............................................

1915

                  ............................................

1916

                  ............................................

2.657.168                                        1917

                  ............................................

1918

 4.000.000 ............................................

 

 

 

Approx.

... to be continued ...

NAMES' CHECK

 

 

Shaw & Clark

US  38.246                C.A. SHAW & J.R. CLARK                  April 21 1863

 

Samuel Barker

William P. Barker

William L. Grout

W. G. Wilson

Andrew J.  Clark

J.R. Clark

George Wells Baker

 

 

 

US  19.015          D.W.  CLARK       January 5  1858

US  19.072           D.W.  CLARK   January 12  1858

US  19.129          D.W.  CLARK     January 19  1858

US  19.409        D.W.  CLARK           February 23  1858

US  19.732      D.W.   CLARK    March 23  1858

US  21.322              D.W.  CLARK      August 31  1858

US  23.823           D.W.  CLARK           May 3  1859

US  26.336   EDWIN  CLARK   December 6  1859

US  27.179        C.D.  WHEELER    February 14  1860

US  32.007        H.L.  SHAW      April 9  1861

US  37.202            A.B.  SHAW        December 16  1862

US  74.751   EDWIN E.  CLARK       February 25  1868

 

 

Around 1862William Barker and Andrew J. Clark began producing the "Pride of the West" machine, later calling it the "New England Single Thread Hand Sewing Machine".

 

 

Andrew J. Clark and Wm. P. Barker

In 1865 Mr. Clark bought out his partner and in 1867 a new firm was organized with the name of A. F. Johnson & Co., the works were enlarged and the manufacture of the well-known “Gold Medal” machine was begun. In 1869 the firm was reorgan­ized as a corporation, taking the name of the machine, with Mr. Clark as president and J. W. Wheeler as secretary and treasurer.

 

 US  20.686      A.F.  JOHNSON       June 22  1858

 

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